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Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn77771
Collection
Ometz Collection
Description Level
Series
Material Format
multiple media
Fonds No.
1074; 1
Scope and Content
This series contains records pertaining to or originating from Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Ometz Collection
Description Level
Series
Material Format
multiple media
Scope and Content
This series contains records pertaining to or originating from Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services.
Date
c.1842-2008
Fonds No.
1074
Series No.
1
History Biographical
In 1863 the Young Men’s Hebrew Benevolent Society (YMHBS) was formed by young unmarried men with the desire to help Jews in need. The Society also allowed the young Jewish men of Montreal to get to know each other better and to look after their social welfare needs. By 1882, the Society could not cope financially with the influx of immigrants arriving from Russia, most of who were destitute and had no means of support. The YMHBS appealed to philanthropist Baron Maurice de Hirsh. In 1890, Baron de Hirsch sent his first donation and in 1891, the Baron de Hirsch Institute opened and was dedicated to the purpose of “A Free School for the poor children of the Jewish faith and a home for sheltering distressed immigrants and orphans.” In 1900 Baron de Hirsch enlarged its sphere, and in recognition of the financial support received, obtained a new charter of incorporation to change its name to Baron de Hirsch Institute and Hebrew Benevolent Society of Montreal. The Institute was the pioneer charitable and philanthropic organization in Montreal. In 1917, because of the overlapping of much charitable and philanthropic work, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies was formed with headquarters in the Baron de Hirsch Institute building. Baron de Hirsch became one of the constituent societies and continued its activities with the religious school, library, cemetery, family welfare, legal aid and Hebrew Court of Arbitration. The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies changed names three times. It became Federation of Jewish Community Services in 1951, Allied Jewish Community Services (AJCS) in 1965 and today’s Federation CJA in 1997. AJCS was under the direction of Manny Batshaw from 1967-1980). In 1974 the Jewish Family Services Social Service Centre (JFSSSC) was created and incorporated almost all the programs and human resources of the Baron de Hirsch Institute. Jewish Family Services encompassed these two organizations by providing joint structure for their complementing mandates. The JFSSSC was a publicly funded agency, working alongside the private JFS of the Baron de Hirsch Institute and primarily served the Jewish population. The JFSSSC became responsible for youth protection, young offenders, adoption and foster care (including group homes and placements for children, disabled adults and the elderly). Over the years, JFS adapted to transformations in Quebec society and developments in the field of social work. As mental health, sex education, addiction, care of the elderly and other concerns were recognized as part of the mandate of a social service provider, JFS developed programs to respond to these needs. JFS’s professional work also included the supervision of many volunteer units (for example, Big Brothers, Big Sisters and hospital volunteers). The public JFSSSC closed in 1993 in response to the Quebec government’s Bill 120 and the cessation of public funding. As a result, Jewish Family Services of the Baron de Hirsch Institute became a full-service, community-based organization.
Language
English
French
Hebrew
Yiddish
Subjects
Baron de Hirsh Institute, Montreal.
Jewish Family Services, Montreal.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Anniversaries and Celebrations

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn77776
Collection
Ometz Collection
Description Level
Series
Material Format
multiple media
Fonds No.
1074; 1.5
Scope and Content
This sub-series consists of textual, graphic, audiovisual and commemorative materials relating to anniversary and celebratory events of the Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Ometz Collection
Description Level
Series
Material Format
multiple media
Scope and Content
This sub-series consists of textual, graphic, audiovisual and commemorative materials relating to anniversary and celebratory events of the Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services.
Date
ca.1963-1983
Fonds No.
1074
Series No.
1.5
Storage Location
Bay 2
Subjects
Jewish Family Services, Montreal.
Baron de Hirsh Institute, Montreal.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services Collection

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn34044
Collection
Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services Collection
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.0 m of textual material : 173 items of graphic material : 2 audiocassettes
Fonds No.
1074
Scope and Content
Series 1 consists of textual reports that were produced by organizations under the Baron de Hirsch Institute, and are arranged chronologically by organization. Series 2 consists of textual records of meetings of organizations under the Baron de Hirsch Institute. Series 3 consists of textual publica…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Baron de Hirsch Institute/Jewish Family Services Collection
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.0 m of textual material : 173 items of graphic material : 2 audiocassettes
Scope and Content
Series 1 consists of textual reports that were produced by organizations under the Baron de Hirsch Institute, and are arranged chronologically by organization. Series 2 consists of textual records of meetings of organizations under the Baron de Hirsch Institute. Series 3 consists of textual publications produced by organizations under the Baron de Hirsch Institute. Series 4 consists of photographic and textual materials regarding the history of Jewish Family Services of the Baron de Hirsch Institute. Series 5 consists of textual, graphic, audiovisual, and commemorative materials relating to anniversary and celebratory events. Series 6 consists of textual records for the sale and maintenance of land and plots in relation to cemeteries in the Montreal area.
Date
1842-2007
Fonds No.
1074
Storage Location
JPL
Bay 2
History Biographical
The Baron de Hirsch Institute is the oldest, continuous Jewish social services agency in Quebec and in Canada. With the re-organization of the Hebrew Philanthropic Society, the agency began in July 1863 as the Young Men’s Hebrew Benevolent Society by a group of young unmarried men of Montreal. The organization was an expression of their belief in the ethical tradition of Mitzvah and Tzedakah, and pioneered pathways of service in social welfare. Jewish immigration rose in Montreal in the early 1880s and imposed acute financial burdens on the members of the YMHBS. As such, they appealed for financial assistance to the Austrian Baron Maurice de Hirsch, who had established himself as world Jewry’s greatest philanthropist. Baron and Baroness de Hirsch responded immediately and contributed a substantial donation at the end of the nineteenth century. Soon after, the decision was made to rename the agency the ‘Baron de Hirsch Institute and Young Men’s Hebrew Benevolent Society,’ marking the first of a number of name changes during the agency’s continued existence. A discrepancy exists within the Annual Reports and official history of the Institute as to the exact date of the name change, with some citing 1890 as the date of the decision, while others date it in 1900. Nevertheless, the Institute was revamped for the purpose of Jewish education of the poor and the establishment of a sheltering home for immigrants and orphans. The institution’s other original objectives were, among others, to assist the community of immigrants, provide medical care and burial grounds, establish schools and provide a Jewish public library for the community. In 1901, construction on the Bleury Street community building began, financed by the bequests of the Baron and Baroness de Hirsch who had passed away in 1896 and 1899, respectively. Immigration continued to rise in the early years of the twentieth century, with the weight of assistance falling on the shoulders of the Baron de Hirsch Institute. The first Jewish orphanage, the Montreal Hebrew Orphans’ Home, opened in 1909, followed by the establishment of a summer camp. In 1913, the Institute founded the “Friendly League of Jewish Women,” and the “Welcome Club for Jewish Working Girls.” Many immigrants did estabish themselves independently and formed new organizations that began to share in the burdens of caring for the social welfare of the community. Moreover, a 1916 provincial charter created the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Montreal, launched through the initiative of the Institute, to serve as a coordinating body for the division of labour between the organizations of the Jewish community. The Baron de Hirsch Institute is structured in three major divisions: Family and Child Welfare (including the Visiting Homemaker Service), Legal Aid, and Cemetery (incorporated in 1971) Departments. It is a constituent member agency of Federation CJA, a member of the Association of Jewish Family and Children’s Agencies, and a member of the Conference of Jewish Communal Service. The Baron de Hirsch Institute has evolved throughout the years in the promotion of community partnerships and to adapt to changes in Quebec legislation. In June 1973, the Baron de Hirsch Institute moved to Cummings House; the move provided the agency with expanded and dignified quarters within which to pursue its work. A further aesthetic shift occurred with the change of the Baron de Hirsch Institute logo as its 125th anniversary approached in July 1988. The Institute has gone through a number of official name changes, collaborations and mergers as well, including those with the Hebrew Benevolent Society of Montreal, Jewish Child Welfare Bureau, the CLSC-JFS Cote St. Luc/Hampstead, and Jewish Family Services Social Service Centre. The Jewish Family Services Social Service Centre, a public social service centre, was created in 1973 with funding from Allied Jewish Community Services in response to Chapter 48 of Quebec legislation. Its aim was to bridge the gap between private agency sectarianism and government sponsored social services. For twenty years, the public Jewish Family Services Social Service Centre was linked with the private Jewish Family Services of the Baron de Hirsch Institute, with the Institute providing supplemental funding and services to areas within the Social Service Centre. In 1993, however, the Quebec provincial government enacted Reform Bill 120, whereby Jewish Family Services Social Service Centre ceased to exist with the termination of public funding. The two agencies became separate with the closing of the Social Service Centre, but the Baron de Hirsch Institute continued to provide direct or referral services to Jewish individuals in Montreal. During its existence, the Baron de Hirsch Institute has expanded to include involvement in a library, schools, immigrant aid, shelters, reception centres, farming communities, medical care, burial, orphanages, adoption, civil rights advocacy, fund-raising, social services, housing, vocational services, legal aid, chaplaincy, rehabilitative services, and many other activities. Family welfare increasingly became the Institute’s focus as it continued to meet the changing social needs of the Montreal community that were not met elsewhere. While maintaining ties with other community agencies throughout its history, the Institute has maintained its identity in order to service the Jewish community in the best possible way to provide the tools for self-help and group solidarity. Amid times of economic and political difficulties, the Baron de Hirsch Institute continued to stress the critical role of voluntarism as its greatest strength. Despite changes in location and official institutional names, Jewish Family Services of the Baron de Hirsch Institute continued to progress and advance with the times, backed by its historic mandate to provide services to people in need, within the Jewish tradition.
Language
English
French
Custodial History
This material was transferred directly to the Jewish Public Library Archives (JPL-A) directly from Jewish Family Services of the Baron de Hirsch Institute (JFS). The material in the Fonds was collected or produced by JFS over the course of its history.
Arrangement
Additional material on the Baron de Hirsch Institute and Jewish Family Services also exists in the Library’s Jewish Canadiana clipping and ephemera collection. This material was collected by the Library and as such is kept separate from the material donated directly by the JFS. An appendix is attached at the end of this Finding Aid containing a file listing for the Jewish Canadiana collection of JFS material.
Access Restriction
Some privacy restriction may apply.
Related Material
See related collections at the Canadian Jewish Congress Charities Committee National Archives.
See "Photograph Collection"
See "Jewish Canadiana Collection" of the Jewish Public Library.
Subjects
Baron de Hirsh Institute, Montreal -- Cemetary Department.
Baron de Hirsh Institute, Montreal -- Group foster homes.
Baron de Hirsh Institute, Montreal.
Jewish Family Services, Montreal.
Philanthropy
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Social Work

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn16732
Collection
Manny Batshaw Fonds
Description Level
Series
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3cm textual records
Fonds No.
1059; 2
Scope and Content
This series consists of seven copies of the summary of the Report of the Study Committee on Socially Disturbed Children in Juvenile Institutions, otherwise known as the Batshaw Report. Further accruals in this series are expected.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Manny Batshaw Fonds
Description Level
Series
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3cm textual records
Scope and Content
This series consists of seven copies of the summary of the Report of the Study Committee on Socially Disturbed Children in Juvenile Institutions, otherwise known as the Batshaw Report. Further accruals in this series are expected.
Date
1975 (predominant)
Fonds No.
1059
Series No.
2
Storage Location
Bay 6
Creator
Manny Batshaw
History Biographical
See Fonds description
Custodial History
Donated by Manny Batshaw
Name Access
Batshaw, Manuel G., 1915-
Subjects
Batshaw Youth and Family Centres = Les Centres de la jeunesse et de la famille Batshaw
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Manny Batshaw Fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn16730
Collection
Manny Batshaw Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.7m of textual documents ; 347 photographs
Fonds No.
1059
Scope and Content
The Fonds consists of correspondence regarding both personal and business matters, newspaper clippings (both loose and in scrapbooks), publications by AJCS and other Jewish organizations, a published biography of Manuel Batshaw, documents regarding his time as a social worker, photographs, audio an…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Manny Batshaw Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1.7m of textual documents ; 347 photographs
Scope and Content
The Fonds consists of correspondence regarding both personal and business matters, newspaper clippings (both loose and in scrapbooks), publications by AJCS and other Jewish organizations, a published biography of Manuel Batshaw, documents regarding his time as a social worker, photographs, audio and visual materials and awards. There are three series present within the Fonds. Series I covers Mr. Batshaw’s personal affairs, and consists mainly of photographs, degrees, certificates, scrapbooks and correspondence. Series II covers Mr. Batshaw’s career as a social worker, and currently consists of a summary of the 1975 Batshaw Report, although further accruals are expected. Series III covers Mr. Batshaw’s professional work within the Jewish community, and consists of annual reports, publications, awards and photographs.
Date
1918-2006
Fonds No.
1059
Storage Location
Bay 6
Creator
Manny Batshaw
History Biographical
Manuel Gilman Batshaw (Manny) was born in Montreal on April 17, 1915. His parents, Tuvieh Batshaw and Golda Batshaw (née Gelman) immigrated to Montreal from Russia in 1903, following the birth of Manny’s older brother Harry in 1902 [?]. Harry was followed by Arthur in 1908, Frances in 1910 and finally, Manny. The family had a very limited income. While his father worked outside of the home, Manny’s mother Goldie ran a small grocery store from their home’s living room. From childhood, Manny was quite active within the Montreal Jewish community. In 1928, as a bar mitzvah gift from his brother Harry, Manny received a membership to the YMHA. Over the years, he moved from member, to club leader, to being in charge of all clubs, and finally, to educational director. It was through this organization that Manny had his first experiences in the field of social work. At 15 years old, he joined Young Judea. At 16, he became a counselor at Camp B’nai Brith. In 1938, Manny met Rachel Levitt (Rachie). She was also a social worker, nine years his senior. Two years later in 1940, the two were married. In 1942, Manny volunteered for the Canadian Armed Forces. He was placed in the Infantry and was made District Social Service Officer in charge of Social Services to the Canadian Armed Forces in the province of Quebec. He began his military career as a Private and by the time the War was over had attained the rank of Captain. After the War he was invited to become the Executive Director of the Red Cross in Montreal. As tempting as the offer was, he wanted to play a larger role within the Jewish community, so he declined. From 1947-1968, the Batshaw family moved quite a bit living in Philadelphia, Hamilton, Atlanta, Newark, New Jersey and New York. In 1968, the Allied Jewish Community Services (AJCS) contacted Manny, and asked him to return to Montreal as Executive Director of the organization. He agreed, and remained in that position until 1980. During the “Batshaw Era,” fundraising increased five-fold and the organization expanded, made obvious by the many buildings which were constructed, including Cummings House in 1973. He personally helped to reassure the community following the implementation of Bill 65, and made it his own personal mission to look after his people. He insisted on making it the right of all Jewish children to have a Jewish education, he helped to integrate the Francophone Sephardic population into the AJCS, he organized trips for students to visit Israel, and in the face of possible Quebec separation (when many Anglophone Jews were leaving the province), he fought for French Immersion education in Jewish schools. His compassion was felt beyond the walls of AJCS. In 1974, following a news story in The Montreal Gazette regarding the maltreatment of children in a welfare institution in La Prairie, Manny convinced Claude Forget, Minister of Health and Welfare for the province of Quebec, to allow him to form a small committee of professionals to go into the institution and make recommendations. The approval arrived the next day on a Thursday, the committee was formed the following day, and by Sunday night, the visit had been completed and the finished report had been delivered to the Minister. The recommendations were published in the local newspapers and soon after almost all of them had been implemented. Obviously impressed, Mr. Forget asked Manny to spearhead a thorough examination of the province’s 60 other institutions. What followed 11 months later was an 11-volume report, informally titled The Batshaw Committee Report. This led to the enactment of Bill 24, Quebec’s Youth Protection Act. In 1993, when the five Anglophone child welfare institutions of Quebec amalgamated, the new name was an easy choice: Batshaw Youth and Family Centres. After his retirement from AJCS in 1980, Manny joined Claridge Inc. at the request of his friend Charles Bronfman as his Consultant on Philanthropy and Jewish Affairs. He retired from this position in 1998.
Custodial History
Donated in 2006 by Manny Batshaw.
Name Access
Batshaw, Manuel G., 1915-
Subjects
Camp B'nai Brith
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Association
Batshaw Youth and Family Centres = Les Centres de la jeunesse et de la famille Batshaw
Federation CJA - Montreal (Quebec)
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Snowdon Properties – General

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn38182
Collection
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Association
Description Level
File
Material Format
multiple media
Fonds No.
1256; 2; 00209
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Association
Description Level
File
Material Format
multiple media
Fonds No.
1256
Series No.
2
File No.
00209
Storage Location
CTN. 007
Language
English
Notes
letters, plans, memoranda
Access Restriction
Some privacy laws may apply.
Reproduction Restrictions
Some copyright laws may apply.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Balensman/Belson Families Collection

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn31358
Collection
Balensman/Belson Families Collection
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
7 files of texutal records + 12 photographs
Fonds No.
1252
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 8 files of original and photocopied material including: family photographs, correspondence, newspaper clippings and a loan certificate. Material touches on the families' time in La Macaza, Quebec.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Balensman/Belson Families Collection
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
7 files of texutal records + 12 photographs
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 8 files of original and photocopied material including: family photographs, correspondence, newspaper clippings and a loan certificate. Material touches on the families' time in La Macaza, Quebec.
Fonds No.
1252
Storage Location
2-3C
JPL
Subjects
Colonization -- Jews
Agriculture
Balensman family
Belson family
La Macaza (Quebec)
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Helfield/Gallay Fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn16735
Collection
Helfield/Gallay Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.33m textual records ; 200 photographs ; 60 artefacts
Scope and Content
Series 1 and series 2 include textual records arranged chronologically. Series 3 consists of group photographs related to Wilfred Gallay’s professional life and a group of family snapshots dating mostly from the 1920s. Series 4 consists of religious objects, and kitchen and tailoring artefact…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Helfield/Gallay Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.33m textual records ; 200 photographs ; 60 artefacts
Scope and Content
Series 1 and series 2 include textual records arranged chronologically. Series 3 consists of group photographs related to Wilfred Gallay’s professional life and a group of family snapshots dating mostly from the 1920s. Series 4 consists of religious objects, and kitchen and tailoring artefacts documenting the spiritual, domestic and professional life of members of the Helfield and Gallay families over more than a century.
Date
ca189[?]-ca198[?]
Storage Location
Bay 3
History Biographical
Tylia Helfield Tylia Helfield was born in Montreal in 1934. She received her (BFA) from Concordia University in. She is a writer, printmaker and artist. Eric Sidney Helfield Eric Sidney Helfield was born in Montreal in 1931. (where he lived and went to school) He was awarded a Bachelor’s degree in 1952 and a (BCL, 1955) from McGill University. He was a barrister and served for 14 years, between 1976 and 1990, as councilor of the former City of Côte-Saint-Luc. Eric Helfield died 3 October 1992 in Montreal. Marks Ellis Marks Ellis was born in Lithuania in 1873. A tailor by trade, he immigrated via London to Montreal in 1895, accompanied by his wife Mary. He established Bellingham Cleaners in the 1930s, at the corner of Bellingham and Maplewood streets (now rue Vincent-d’Indy and boulevard Edouard-Montpetit) and operated the business for two years. He worked as a tailor during the Second World War for Sterling Clothing on Park Avenue, and at Scott’s Clothing. In 1927, Ellis was involved in the founding of the United Commercial Loan Syndicate, formed by Jewish businessmen who gave loans at low interest rates to Jewish immigrants. He was also one of the founders of the Congregation Shaare Zedek in Montreal. He retired in 1956 at the age of 82 and died in Montreal on 26 December 1965. Ellis was the maternal grandfather of Eric Helfield. Children: Barnett, Mildred, Samuel. Brother of Bluma Ellis. Wilfred Gallay (Dr) Wilfred Gallay was born 10 June 1906 in Hawkesbury, Ontario. He went to elementary school and later obtained a First Class Teacher’s Certificate in Calgary, Alberta. Gallay studied chemistry at McGill University in Montreal, and was awarded a Ph.D. in 1930. He carried out post-doctoral research at the University of Leipzig and at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute in Berlin, Germany. On his return to Canada, he worked at the National Research Council in Ottawa, becoming head of the Section on Colloids and Plastics. From 1944 to 1953, he was a consultant to Canadian and American firms and from 1953 until his retirement in 1971, he was Director of Research and Member of the Board of Directors of the E. B. Eddy Company in Hull, Quebec. In the course of his career, Gallay published some 85 scientific papers chiefly in the field of colloid or surface chemistry and was the recipient of several fellowships, awards and honours, including the Bolton Award the Technical Section Medal from the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association, and the Plummer Medal of the Engineering Institute of Canada. Gallay was also involved with several scientific organizations and served namely on various committees of the Canadian Pulp and Paper Association and as Secretary General of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. He was a prominent member of the Jewish community in Ottawa. Wilfred Gallay married Birdie Silver in 19xx, and was the father of Tylia Helfied. He died in Toronto.
Language
English, Yiddish, Hebrew
Custodial History
Donated by Tilya Helfield
Notes
Further accurals expected.
Subjects
Helfield family
Helfield, Tilya
Gallay family
Furriers
Fur trade
Tailors
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Mandelker Family Fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn18193
Collection
Mandelker Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.15 l.m. multiple media
Fonds No.
1247
Scope and Content
Consists of two fashion drawings, a ring drawing, a brooch drawing, sheet music for "A Centennial Song", Expo 67 postcards, a large postcard for Man and His World and 117 family photographs, some with descriptions.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Mandelker Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.15 l.m. multiple media
Scope and Content
Consists of two fashion drawings, a ring drawing, a brooch drawing, sheet music for "A Centennial Song", Expo 67 postcards, a large postcard for Man and His World and 117 family photographs, some with descriptions.
Date
[191-]-[194-]
Fonds No.
1247
Storage Location
1-6B; Ctn.001-002
Conservation
Photographs separated for processing.
History Biographical
The Mandelker family of Montreal actually started their lives in Chicoutimi, Quebec, evidenced by the photographs of the Mandelker's general store at the turn of the century. Eventually moving to Montreal, one of the daughters became a fashion and jewellery designer and the son, a prominent police officer with the Montreal police force.
Language
English
Acquisition Source
Roger Woo
Custodial History
Unknown, the family material was at one point in an antique store before being donated to the JPL Archives.
Notes
CTN. 002, contains all photographs, placed in Photograph Collection area for future processing.
Subjects
Mandelker family
Chicoutimi (Quebec)
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Diana Rosenbaum Collection

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn44051
Collection
Diana Rosenbaum Collection
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
2 photographs + 1 book
Fonds No.
1273
Scope and Content
Collection consists of one oversized composite portrait of the 1951 female graduating class of Baron Byng High School as well as their teachers. Also includes a group portrait of 1951 graduating class members at a reunion in 1987 and a commemorative book from the 50th reunion in 2001.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Diana Rosenbaum Collection
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
2 photographs + 1 book
Scope and Content
Collection consists of one oversized composite portrait of the 1951 female graduating class of Baron Byng High School as well as their teachers. Also includes a group portrait of 1951 graduating class members at a reunion in 1987 and a commemorative book from the 50th reunion in 2001.
Fonds No.
1273
Storage Location
JPL
8-3B
Language
English
Accession No.
10-013
Subjects
Baron Byng High School (Montreal, Quebec)
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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