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Income statement

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59432
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Income statement : Paper : Printed, typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 4 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Income statement : Paper : Printed, typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 4 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1942
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Slip of paper with two holes punched horizontally. Income Statement Machinery Service Ltd., Ville Lasalle, for Isaac Herbert Isselbaecher employed for 7 months. Employee copy indicating that Herbert earned $770.74 in this 7 month pay period with $97.11 deducted for taxes. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.44
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Ville LaSalle, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Men building a road

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn75226
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w ; Ht: 3 3/8 in. x W: 5 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w ; Ht: 3 3/8 in. x W: 5 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1930
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
b&w, group of men standing on a road being built. Avrum Katz, a civil engineer can be seen 4th from the left. The road is located between the city of Kowel and Vledema. Narrative: Awrum Katz was the donor's father. Born in 1892, Awrum Katz was married to Rebecca Pfeffer. He worked as a civil engineer. They moved to England in 1939, with their children Rose and Moshe. From England they travelled to New York to attend the World Fair. They were denied citizenship in the USA and later settled in Montreal. Avrum worked as a peddler and attended university at night to become a civil engineer. He died in 1942.
Accession No.
1999.25.03
Name Access
Melnick, Rose
Places
Kowel, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Teenager in front of building

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn47983
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Film negative : plastic : photography : sepia ; Ht: 1 3/4 in. x W: 1 3/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Film negative : plastic : photography : sepia ; Ht: 1 3/4 in. x W: 1 3/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
sepia, no border. Outdoors, teenage boy wearing a hat and quilted jacket standing in front of a building. A woman wearing a jacket is visible behind him.
Accession No.
1999.06.137
Name Access
Voticky, Anka
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

School building with children in front

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60164
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w ; Ht: 13.5 cm x W: 8.4 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w ; Ht: 13.5 cm x W: 8.4 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Slovak
Notes
Outside. A mid-sized building. The sign on the front of the building is written in Slovak (translation) "National Vocational Training School". Several children are seen in front of the building, most have their backs facing the camera. Several trees are around the building on the left-hand side. Narrative: Donor is the wife of Viktor Matus (born Victor Neumann), who survived the war in hiding and came to Montreal in 1949. From Hlohovec, Czechoslovakia. Two older brothers André and Otto were killed in January 1945 uprising. Parents were deported and killed in Auschwitz. Brother Marcel Neumann survived.
Accession No.
2013.14.04
Name Access
Matus, Greta
Places
Hlohovec, Slovakia, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Jewel Trading Co. building, Shanghai

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn47938
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : photography : sepia, white, black ; Ht: 13,8 cm x W: 9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : photography : sepia, white, black ; Ht: 13,8 cm x W: 9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1940-1941
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
sepia, white border. Outdoors. View of Jewel Trading Co. building in Shanghai. Narrative: Jewel Trading Co. was built and owned by the Voticky family; this building was never used.
Accession No.
1990.102.13
Name Access
Voticky, Anka
Places
Shanghai, China, Republic of, Asia
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Statement : paper : Typewritten : ink : Beige, Red, Black ; Ht: 30 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Statement : paper : Typewritten : ink : Beige, Red, Black ; Ht: 30 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
July 25, 1938
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Paper divided into four sections by fold. Red ink stamp at the centre bottom of the page from the Leopolstadt district court. Document officialises emancipation of Liselotte Goldberger, aged 19 at the time. No. 236/38/1 Narrative: Charlotte Urban, originally called Liselotte Goldberger, was born in 1919 in Vienna, Austria. Her parents were Yaakob and Franzi Goldberger. She lived with her family in an apartment on Staudinger Gasse in Brigittenau, which was a mostly-Jewish area. She considered herself more Viennese, and her first language was German. In a statement she says she remembers when the Germans invaded Austria during the Anschluss. One day, she and her mother were ordered out of their building by the SA and forced to scrub the pavement in front of a crowd. Afterwards the commander wrote them a receipt for their work on a piece of cigarette paper. Charlotte kept it until her death. Her father had made it to England, and was working to get her and her mother visa. He was away during the Kristallnacht. They remained safe because their land lady, Frau Grabner, had a son in the Nazi party and would use that to discourage troops from coming into their room. When Charlotte got her papers her mother decided to stay with her family. They parted at the station, and Charlotte never saw her again. Liselotte later discovered that her mother had been deported to Theresienstadt in October 1942. Charlotte changed her name to Charlotte Goldhill and married Joseph Urban in 1951. She became a Canadian citizen in 1959.
Accession No.
2010.16.21
Name Access
Berger, Leon
Places
Vienna, Austria, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Bank statement

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59444
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bank statement : Paper : Typewritten, printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 8,5 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bank statement : Paper : Typewritten, printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 8,5 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 04, 1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Slip of paper with serrated top edge and two holes punched. Bank Statement from CIBC shows the state of Mr. Isaac Herbert Isselbaecher’ s bank account on 1945/3/4. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remaining prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.65
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Bergen-Belsen former prisoners eating inside a building

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn45493
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : photography : black, white ; Ht: 8 in. x W: 10 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : photography : black, white ; Ht: 8 in. x W: 10 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1945-1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
b&w, white border. Indoors. Emaciated men wearing white shirts, their lower halves wrapped in blankets. They are sitting up on stretchers and eating or talking. The stretchers are lined up perpendicular to the wall and the windows are all open. Opposite the prisoners sit two soldiers, talking to them; the soldiers' faces are not visible.
Accession No.
2005.37.02
Name Access
Benoit, Lucien
Places
Bergen-Belsen, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Pile of corpses in front of camp building after Liberation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn78347
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 5,8 cm x W: 4,1 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 5,8 cm x W: 4,1 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Later than 1945-04-29]
Physical Condition
Excellent
Notes
White border with black photograph adhesive corner on top right side. Outdoor scene. Pile of emaciated corpses in front of a camp building, maybe a crematorium; some are naked others have clothes. The photograph was taken in Dachau concentration camp upon Liberation of the concentration camp by the U.S. Seventh Army's 45th Infantry Division.
Accession No.
2015.10.12
Name Access
Weiser, Edward
Places
Dachau, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Statement of Continued Employment

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59480
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Statement of Continued Employment : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 28 in. x W: 21,5 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Statement of Continued Employment : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 28 in. x W: 21,5 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
November 27, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Page with two holes punched on left, impression stamp B.L, Stahl-Meyer letterhead top and crest bottom. Letter written to confirm employment and financial status of David Lowenstein as he sought to aid his nephew's, Helmut Isselbächer, ability to emigrate into the USA. His support was later determined to be insufficient and Helmut was advised to seek other sources of financial support. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1051
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
New York, United States of America, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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