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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : paper : stamped, printed, handwritten : ink : orange-beige, black, red ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 3 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : paper : stamped, printed, handwritten : ink : orange-beige, black, red ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 3 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 20, 1945-September 1, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Chinese
English
Notes
Propaganda card about Friedrich Melchior. Copy of typed identity card, including photograph, stamped every month from April to August 1945 with red ink. The back has a printed diatribe against Mr. Ghoya, Japanese official of the Stateless Refugees’ Affairs Bureau, signed by Friedrich Melchior in black ink and dated Sept. 1945. Narrative: Kanoh Ghoya was the Japanese official in charge of issuing 1-3 month passes allowing Jews out of Hongkew into surrounding districts. He liked to call himself "King of the Jews"; many refugees called him "The Monkey". Ghoya was a very short, unpredictable man who spoke English well and had once been chief of police in Kyushu. He could fly into a rage and often beat or threatened those who applied for a pass; on other days, he would play with refugee children or attend their soccer matches. He was the most visible oppressor of Jews in Shanghai. Friedrich (called Fritz) Melchior was a refugee artist who made several caricatures of Ghoya.
Accession No.
1990.102.04
Name Access
Voticky, Anka
Places
Shanghai, China, Republic of, Asia
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, Yellow, Beige ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 9,3 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, Yellow, Beige ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 9,3 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Hebrew
Notes
1 page. The right hand side shows the tablets of the law written in Hebrew with the Star of David on top. Left hand side is a message of congratulations. Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old . The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach . While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.03
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink; Pencil : Blue, Red, Black, Beige ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 12 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink; Pencil : Blue, Red, Black, Beige ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 12 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Notes
1 page. On the right hand side there is the Star of David above a Torah scroll with a pointer and a prayer book.Left side contains message of congratulations. Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old . The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach . While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.08
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Pencil; Ink : Yellow, Black, Blue, Red, White ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 7,5 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Pencil; Ink : Yellow, Black, Blue, Red, White ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 7,5 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Notes
1 page. Right hand side shows a drawing of young boy wearing shirt, sweater and tie with his hand extended and a text bubble coming from his mouth reading "congratulations" Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old . The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach . While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.07
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, White, Red ; Ht: 5,75 in. x W: 4,25 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, White, Red ; Ht: 5,75 in. x W: 4,25 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 24, 1949
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Hebrew
Notes
2 pages. Photograph of Maria Pineles with her hair pulled back, in the center of the 2nd page. 2 circular ink stamps on the interior of the booklet. Narrative: Maria PIneles is the donor's aunt
Accession No.
2000.86.05
Name Access
Cooperstone, Harvey
Places
Munich, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, White, Blue, Red ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 3,25 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, White, Blue, Red ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 3,25 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1954-04-11-1968
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
German
Notes
2 pages, front cover has an illustration of a brick chimney with a basin on the top, with a fire coming out of it, and a cloud above it. Back cover has blue and white stripes and a red triangle with the letter F in the centre (identification of French political prisoners). Membership card for the French Association of survivors of Buchenwald Dora and camps. Narrative: Donor Desire Klein was a survivor of Buchenwald concentration camp.
Accession No.
1998.46.01
Name Access
Klein, Desiré
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Beige, Red, Green, Blue ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 25 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Beige, Red, Green, Blue ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 25 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 19, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, Double-sided with a vertical fold down the middle. There is horizontal, as well as vertical text. On the inside there is an illustration of a boy riding a horse, and two of the seven dwarfs sawing wood across the top, and another one of the seven dwarfs hammering a nail, in the lower left corner along the fold. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2012X.20.01
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
card : Paper : Ink : Beige, Pink, Green, Black, Purple ; Ht: 15,5 cm x W: 23 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
card : Paper : Ink : Beige, Pink, Green, Black, Purple ; Ht: 15,5 cm x W: 23 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 02, 1940
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
French
Notes
1 page, Double-sided with a vertical fold down the middle. There is text on the front, as well as on the inside. There is also an illustration of a girl wearing a vertically striped skirt, talking to a man at a podium who has a feather in his hat, across the top of the front of the card. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2012X.20.02
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Cardstock : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 6,8 cm x W: 10,9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Cardstock : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 6,8 cm x W: 10,9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 17, 1924
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
German
Notes
Single sided, with two lines in the middle, and the date in the bottom left corner. thank you card sent tpo guests following the wedding of Shulim and Sophie Philipson. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.245
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Beige ; Ht: 4 5/8 in. x W: 6 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Beige ; Ht: 4 5/8 in. x W: 6 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
July 21, 1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Polish
Notes
two panel card folded in two with b&w photo of Mendel Zeliger attached to inside. Work card for Lodz ghetto. Stamped, Nr. 3312. Narrative: Mendel Zeliger was born July 24, 1926. He started working as an apprentice in the Lodz ghetto, making small furniture on February 24, 1942.
Accession No.
2011X.364.01
Name Access
Zeliger, Michael
Places
Lodz (Litzmannstadt), Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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