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Wedding invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn50524
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding invitation : Paper : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 17,9 cm x W: 28,9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding invitation : Paper : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 17,9 cm x W: 28,9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
May 1924
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
German
Hebrew
Notes
1 page, single sided with two columns. The column on the left is in German, and the Column on the right is in Hebrew. Wedding invitation for Sophie Orbach and Shulim (later Serge) Philipson. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.244
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Berlin, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Wedding invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn75197
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 8 cm x W: 14 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 8 cm x W: 14 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 16, 1942
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Printed card with embossed border, two holes punched in left, printed note. Invitation card to the marriage of Hilde Loeb and Kurt Lieber. Dated by 16th September, 1942. Hilde Loeb was related to Isaac Herbert Isselbacher. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.01.61
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
New York, United States of America, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Wedding Invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59482
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 16 cm x W: 26 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 16 cm x W: 26 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Card folded in half vertically, four holes punched parallel to crease, angular embossed border. Wedding Invitation From Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff to the marriage of their daughter, Fanny, to Isaac Herbert Isselbacher. Marriage set for 26 December 1943 at the Bnai Jacob Synagogue. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1061
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Wedding Invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59483
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 16 cm x W: 26 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 16 cm x W: 26 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Card folded in half vertically, two holes punched on top, angular embossed border. Wedding Invitation From Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff to the marriage of their daughter, Fanny, to Isaac Herbert Isselbacher. Marriage set for 26 December 1943 at the Bnai Jacob Synagogue. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1062
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Wedding Invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59485
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 19 cm x W: 12,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 19 cm x W: 12,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Card with embossed border, two holes punched on left, two addresses at bottom, and creased horizontally through center. From Mr. and Mrs. N. Baril on the occasion of their daughter Shirley's marriage to Fred Isselbacher. Addressed to Isaac and Fanny Isselbacher. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1071
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Wedding Invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59400
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 6 1/2 in. x W: 5 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 6 1/2 in. x W: 5 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Calligraphy card with embossed edge, creased horizontally in center. Invitation card for the marriage of Rose Geiger to Harold Palefsky. Dated 22 October 1944. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.63
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
New York, United States of America, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Wedding Invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59702
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 19 cm x W: 26 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 19 cm x W: 26 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1942
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Hebrew
Notes
Folded card with two holes punched on crease, invitation in English printed on front and repeated in Hebrew inside. From Mrs. N. Yaffe to Mr. Isaac and Fanny Isselbacher inviting them to her daughter’s wedding. Invitation to the wedding of Hilda Yaffe to Louis Walder on 24 December 1942. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1072
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Wedding Invitation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59703
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 17 cm x W: 14 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Wedding Invitation : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 17 cm x W: 14 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Card with two holes punched on crease, invitation in printed on front, angular embossed border, monogram T.L. From Mr. and Mrs. Alter Evans to Isaac and Fanny Isselbaecher inviting them to the wedding of their daughter. Invitation to the wedding of Jean Evans to Hans Herman Rosenberg on 26 November 1944. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1073
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Invitation and notice of wedding.

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn71204
Collection
Benditsky Family Fonds
Description Level
File
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 cards, 1 newsletter
Fonds No.
1295; 3; 00021
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Benditsky Family Fonds
Description Level
File
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 cards, 1 newsletter
Date
1945
Fonds No.
1295
Series No.
3
File No.
00021
Storage Location
JPL
Notes
Contains two wedding invitations for October 14th, 1945, as well as the Shaare Zion Synagogue Bulletin, which mentions the union on its last page.
Subjects
Benditsky Family Fonds
Shaare Zion Synagogue [Montreal, Quebec].
War brides
World War, 1939-1945
Military Personnel -- Canada.
Royal Canadian Air Force
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
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Invitation to a Jewish wedding in Shanghai

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn44369
Collection
CONGREGATION SHAAR HASHOMAYIM MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Document : Paper : b&w : English
Fonds No.
SH-01; 808
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
CONGREGATION SHAAR HASHOMAYIM MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Document : Paper : b&w : English
Date
1939
Fonds No.
SH-01
Item No.
808
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
"Rev. and Mrs. M. Brown request the pleasure of the company of Miss Ruth Segall and Family at the marriage of their daughter Henrietta (Netta) to Dr. Erwin Reifler on Wednesday, 20th September, 1939, at Ohel Rachel Synagogue, 500 Seymour Road at 4 p.m., Reception: Shanghai Jewish School, 544 Seymour Road at 4.30-7 p.m."
Places
Shanghai, China, China
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Congregation Shaar Hashomayim Museum and Archives
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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