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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Typed, Handwritten : Colour pencil; Ink : Beige, Black, Red ; Ht: 15,7 cm x W: 10,7 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Typed, Handwritten : Colour pencil; Ink : Beige, Black, Red ; Ht: 15,7 cm x W: 10,7 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 4, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once horizontally. Document states that Otto Bondy requested and received a refugee allowance on September 4, 1940. The number 21 is written in red at the top right corner of the page. Narrative: Otto Bondy was the father of the donor, Walter Absil. He was born in Vienna, Austria on January 1, 1897, and fled to Belgium with his family in 1938. In September 1940 he was interned with other German and Austrian Jews in St-Cyprien, but he escaped and returned to Brussels. He was deported from the Malines (Melechen) transit camp in Belgium to Auschwitz in September 1943, where he was murdered.
Accession No.
1990.96.11
Name Access
Absil, Walter
Places
Perpignan, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Typed, Handwritten : Graphite pencil : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 1,5 in. x W: 5,5 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Typed, Handwritten : Graphite pencil : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 1,5 in. x W: 5,5 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Piece of beige paper with the German word Anerkannt - Recognized (trad.) typed on it, with the signature below it in pencil. Narrative: This receipt was signed by the mother of the donor, Walter Absil. Such receipts were issued to give camp inmates the impression that their belongings would be returned to them. Walter Absil obtained this receipt with his mother's earrings, as well as a receipt signed by his father and his father's watch, after the war. The objects had been found by Allied forces in a railroad car full of jewelry confiscated from prisoners. It is likely that the jewelry was confiscated from Margarethe Bondy-Fischer upon her arrival in Auschwitz.
Accession No.
2011X.64.04
Name Access
Absil, Walter
Places
Auschwitz, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Handwritten, Typed : Ink; Graphite Pencil : Beige, Black ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 5 3/8 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Handwritten, Typed : Ink; Graphite Pencil : Beige, Black ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 5 3/8 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 4, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Receipt for documents received from Otto Bondy, evacuated from Brussels, indicating his new residence. Receipt issued by Le Receveur des P.T.T., Ministére des Communications. On reverse, there are some mathematical calculations done in pencil. Narrative: Otto Bondy was the father of the donor, Walter Absil. He was born in Vienna, Austria on January 1, 1897, and fled to Belgium with his family in 1938. He was deported from the Malines (Melechen) transit camp in Belgium to Auschwitz in September 1943, where he was murdered.
Accession No.
2011X.64.11
Name Access
Absil, Walter
Places
Perpignan, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Purple ; Ht: 2 in. x W: 9 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Purple ; Ht: 2 in. x W: 9 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 06, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
German
French
Italian
Notes
1 horizontal slip of paper, double-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a receipt for duty and identification coupon for Jakob Baron and family for United States customs at the port of Philadelphia, Pa. Receipt is numbered 317918 on right-hand side. The receipt names the Serpa Pinto as vessel, and is for 8 pieces of baggage. On verso, guidelines for passengers are printed in 4 languages. Narrative: This document was used by the donor, Maurice Baron, and his family during their immigration to Canada in 1944. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. In September 1943, the Barons crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been said that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
Accession No.
2002.13.13
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Philadelphia, United States of America , North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Green, Black, Purple, Blue ; Ht: 13 in. x W: 8,75 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Green, Black, Purple, Blue ; Ht: 13 in. x W: 8,75 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 22, 1944-March 23, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Portuguese
Notes
I page, single-sided. Folded 3 times horizontally and once vertically. Document is a receipt from the Lisbon Customs Office for boarded luggage. It lists 8 pieces of luggage (in Portuguese) which were loaded onto the Serpa Pinto under the name Baron. Document is dated March 22, 1944 and stamped Mar 23, 1944. Price of $50 printed at top right corner. Narrative: Jakob (Jacob) Baron, born 1902 in Wieruszów, Poland, was the father of the donor. The family fled Nancy to Toulouse in 1940, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been said that the ship transported about 7800 refugees during the Second World War, among them hundreds of Jews.
Accession No.
2002.13.12
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : beige, black ; Ht: 4 1/8 in. x W: 8 1/8 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : beige, black ; Ht: 4 1/8 in. x W: 8 1/8 in.
Other Title Information
Function Unknown
Date
November 8, 1913
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Russian
Notes
printed form, filled-out Russian document for German Rosenblat that he paid 4 rubels and 87 kopiiks, in Briceni (Moldova)
Accession No.
2011X.310.125
Name Access
Sourkes, Shana
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed : Ink : Pink, black, grey ; Ht: 10 cm x W: 19 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed : Ink : Pink, black, grey ; Ht: 10 cm x W: 19 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
October 11, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Slip of paper, serrated edge along left and bottom, folded vertically down center. Bank receipt for money exchange to Max Platzen from the Deutsche Verkehrs-Kredit-Bank.
Accession No.
2011X.58.293
Name Access
MHMC
Places
Vienna, Austria, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 33 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 33 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 15, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Page folded in half horizontally, three holes punched in right side, four addition holes punched on fold. Entitled Receipt of Declaration of Intention. Addressed to Isaac Herbert Isselbacher with signature of Secretary of State and Naturalization Branch Chief. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.15
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Ottawa, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, navy, black, purple ; Ht: 9 cm x W: 4,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, navy, black, purple ; Ht: 9 cm x W: 4,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 18, 1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Paper with decorative border, value and instructions on front, note in pencil on back. This is the remitter’s receipt, value of $1, from a letter from Paul Martin, Secretary of the State, to Isaac Herbert Isselbacher. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.282
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Ottawa, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Handwritten, printed : Ink : Black, beige. ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Handwritten, printed : Ink : Black, beige. ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 30, 1942
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Page divided into company information and space for listing payment details. Receipt from Mendelssohn Brothers. To Mr. Isselbaecher for the shipping of his luggage. His former landlady had withheld it until his rent was paid. Attached was a list of items he did not received (Accession number MHMC, #1999.1.642). Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.641
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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