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Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 29,5 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 29,5 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1947-04-17]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Yiddish
Notes
1 horizontal page, folded once vertically to make a four-panel booklet, then folded once horizontally and once vertically. "Amchu" emblem of a harp printed on cover (left panel, verso). Document is a program for a performance of the Dybbuk by the "AMCHO" [aka "Amchu"] artists' group in Feldafing. Maier Abramowicz is part of the cast. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.15
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Feldafing , Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Cardboard : Printed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 18 cm x W: 8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Cardboard : Printed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 18 cm x W: 8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1947-04-17]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Yiddish
Notes
1 vertical page, double-sided. On recto, program for a theatrical presentation is printed. Text is mainly in transliterated Yiddish. Verso is a blank punchcard. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.17
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Feldafing, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program ? : Paper : Printed : Ink : Blue, Black ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 23 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program ? : Paper : Printed : Ink : Blue, Black ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 23 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Yiddish
Notes
1 horizontal page, folded vertically to make a four-panel booklet. Document is likely a program for a theatrical production, certainly related to "Amchu" theater group in Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.18
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35,5 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35,5 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 01, 1950
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided, folded vertically to create four panels, then folded once horizontally. Text on right-hand panels on recto and verso.Left-hand panels blank. Document is the program for a Purim concert, arranged as a tribute to the Jewish Hospital of Hope. Concert included a play, staged by Meir Abramowitz. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.24
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 21,5 cm x W: 28 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 21,5 cm x W: 28 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Yiddish
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once vertically to create two distinct panels, then folded once horizontally and once vertically. Document is the program, most likely for a theatrical presentation. Left panel contains four advertisements, text mainly in English. Right panel is in Yiddish, contains information about the presentation with a numbered list, divided into 2 sections. Left side contains the names of the actors; Mayer Abramovitch appears four times. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.30
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
May 14, 1967
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
English
Notes
3 pages, single-sided. Document is a program for the Montreal memorial rally commemorating the 22nd anniversary of the liberation of Nazi-occupied Europe. Event organized by the Association of Survivor of Nazi Oppression. Narrative: The Association of Survivors of Nazi Oppression, formerly the Association of Former Concentration Camp Inmates, Survivors of Nazi Oppression, was founded circa 1960 in Montreal. Many of its members were founding members of the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre.
Accession No.
2014X.04.08
Name Access
Zablow, Lou
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : ink : grey ; Ht: 8,75 in. x W: 4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : ink : grey ; Ht: 8,75 in. x W: 4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 16, 1979
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
2 sided. Program of official opening ceremony of the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre. One sides is printed with program and the other side with the names of committe members. Guest speaker was Emil Fackenheim Narrative: Committee is composed of Steven Cummings (chairman), Aaron Ain, Aba Beer, Steven Birnbaum, Joanne Cummings, Susanne Cummings, Faigie Edelstein, Anna Kallee, Penny Kolb, Julie Nattel, Isaac Pïasetski, Helen Silberstein, Joel Simms, Nancy Simms, Paul Trepman, Robert Vineberg, Lawrence Yelin, Lou Zablow, Randi Zittrer, Robert Zittrer C.. also named are Janet Blatter (Curator), Eliasoph and Berkowitz Architects, Guest speaker Emil Ludwig Fackenheim (1916-2003) was a Jewish philosopher and Reform rabbi. He was born in Halle, Germany and was arrested during the 1938 November pogroms (known as Kristallnacht). He was intenrned at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp until he escaped with his younger brother Wolfgang to Great Britain. Fackenheim was sent to Canada in 1940 as an "enemy alien" and interned at an internment camp near Sherbrooke, Quebec. After his release he served ad intermim Rabbi in Hamilton, Ontario (1943-1948). He received a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto with a dissertation on Medieval Arabic Philosophy (1945) and became Professor of Philosophy (1948–1984). He emigrated to Israel in 1984.
Accession No.
2011X.58.212
Name Access
MHMC
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Grey ; Ht: 8,25 in. x W: 6,75 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Grey ; Ht: 8,25 in. x W: 6,75 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Yiddish
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Handwritten program, possibly for a performance. Writing is very faded.
Accession No.
2011X.64.02
Name Access
Absil, Walter
Places
Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : printed : Ink : off-white, black ; Ht: 14 in. x W: 8 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : printed : Ink : off-white, black ; Ht: 14 in. x W: 8 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[ca. 1944-11-29]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
1 page. one-sided copie. On the t. is a concept art reminiscent of a musical clef. The document shows the ghetto-camp of Theresienstadt's recreational activities program from 1944-11-23 to 1944-11-29. It reports about speeches, lectures and a concerts. Narrative: The Theresienstadt "camp-ghetto" existed between 1941-11-24 and 1945-05-09. It served the three following: a transit camp for Czech Jews, a ghetto-labour camp for certain categories of German, Austrian, and Czech Jews (based on their age, disability as a result of past military service, or domestic celebrity in the arts and culture), and a holding pen for Jews in the above-mentioned groups. It was expected that that poor internment conditions would hasten the deaths of many deportees, until the survivors could be deported to killing centers in the East.
Accession No.
2013X.09.05
Name Access
Barber, Anna
Places
Terezin, Theresienstadt, Czech Republic, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : printed : Ink : off-white, black ; Ht: 8 in. x W: 14 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : printed : Ink : off-white, black ; Ht: 8 in. x W: 14 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Later than 1944]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
1 page. One-sided. Copy of summaries of the entertainment program in the ghetto-camp of Theresienstadt between 1942 and 1944. All together 500 events were organized. Narrative: The Theresienstadt "camp-ghetto" existed between 1941-11-24 and 1945-05-09. It served the three following: a transit camp for Czech Jews, a ghetto-labour camp for certain categories of German, Austrian, and Czech Jews (based on their age, disability as a result of past military service, or domestic celebrity in the arts and culture), and a holding pen for Jews in the above-mentioned groups. It was expected that that poor internment conditions would hasten the deaths of many deportees, until the survivors could be deported to killing centers in the East.
Accession No.
2013X.09.03
Name Access
Barber, Anna
Places
Terezin, Theresienstadt, Czech Republic, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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