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Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76175
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Green
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Green
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Document is a Displaced Persons index card for Judith Winkler, issued by the Allied Expeditionary Force. It is numbered G 11228281. 'NOT A PASS' written across the card on the diagonal. Holder's name is written in blue ink, and her signature appears below it in pencil. On verso, printed text advises holder to keep card at all times "to assist your safe return home". Narrative: Judith Winkler was born in Hungary. She was deported to Auschwitz on July 9, 1944 and was liberated on May 14, 1945 in Dachau. After the war she lived in the Bergen-Belsen Displaced Persons Camp until her brother found her and took her to Ainring Displaced Persons Camp. He was living there with Mendel Berlach; both men had survived a death march together. Judith and Mendel married in March 1947.
Accession No.
1999.28.06
Name Access
Berlach, Judith
Places
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
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Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76176
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 8 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 8 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 29, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a copy of the registration record of Judith (Judit) Winkler for the Displaced Persons system of the AEF (Allied Expeditionary Force). Recto is a printed form with personal information about Judith. Numbered G21539790. On verso, printed section entitled 'medical clearance certificate' left blank. Narrative: Judith Winkler was born in Hungary. She was deported to Auschwitz on July 9, 1944 and was liberated on May 14, 1945 in Dachau. After the war she lived in the Bergen-Belsen Displaced Persons Camp until her brother found her and took her to Ainring Displaced Persons Camp. He was living there with Mendel Berlach; both men had survived a death march together. Judith and Mendel married in March 1947.
Accession No.
1999.29.08
Name Access
Berlach, Judith
Places
Bergen-Belsen, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76224
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Stamped, Handwritten ; Ht: 7,5 cm x W: 12,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Stamped, Handwritten ; Ht: 7,5 cm x W: 12,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
October 19, 1929-October 28, 1929
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Document is a third class immigration identification card for Rywka Branska. Name of ship 'Letitia' and date of 19 Oct 1929 are stamped on it. On left side of card is space for Medical Examination Stamp, left blank. Ink stamp on right sde of card in space for Civil Examination Stamp. On verso, instructions are printed in 12 languages. Narrative: Card was used by the donor, Rywka Branska (Rebecca Briansky), during her immigration to Canada. Born in Grajewo, Poland, she travelled to Quebec City with her mother and two sisters (Bella and Rita) in 1929. Her father had immigrated 1.5 years prior. Upon arrival in Quebec City, they joined Mr. Branska in Ansonville, Ontario.
Accession No.
2003.21.01
Name Access
Briansky Duchow, Rebecca
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76256
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Green, Purple ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 6 3/7 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Green, Purple ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 6 3/7 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
January 20, 1941-April 01, 1941
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is an Identity card for Chane (Chana) Trompeter from the Basses-Pyrenees office for Refugee Allowance. allows her to receive money every month. Chart on verso with dates and amount allotted demonstrate that Chane received money twice a month from January 20 to April 1, 1941. Narrative: Tuwja (Tuwyas, Tuwia, Tuvia, Tobias) Bercowicz (Berkowicz) was the father of the donor, Jack (Jacques) Berkowicz. Born in Vilna, Tuwyas immigrated to Belgium in 1933 and when Belgium fell to Nazi Germany in 1940, he fled to France, hoping to reach Morocco by boat from Marseilles. The donor's mother,  Chana (Chane, Annie) (Trompeter) Berkowicz in Mielec, Poland, was living in Vienna, Austria with her parents and two sisters. In 1938, after the German annexation of Austria, the family fled, driving to France via Belgium. Tuwyas and Chana met in Lyon, France in 1941 and married. Their daughter Dorothée was born in 1942. The family attempted to flee France by boat in Marseilles, but were stopped by Vichy police. They fled Marseilles and went south, into the Pyrenees region, living in various small vilages. Their son Jack was born in Bernac-Dessus in 1944. The family survived the war and returned to Brussels from 1945-1948, and then immigrated to Canada with the help of the American Joint Distribution Committee. They were sponsored by Tuwyas' sister Luba, who was already living in Halifax. The Berkowicz family settled in Montreal.
Accession No.
2005.01.39
Name Access
Berkowicz, Jack
Places
Lahourcade, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
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Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76292
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Red ; Ht: 4 5/8 in. x W: 2 7/8 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Red ; Ht: 4 5/8 in. x W: 2 7/8 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
January 20, 1939-July 18, 1940
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
French
Dutch
Notes
1 page, double-sided. 3 graphic panels on each side, intended to be folded and carried as a booklet. Folded vertically 2 times. Square b&w photograph of cardholder stapled to document in bottom left corner. Fiscal postage stamps had been affixed at right and left bottom corners, were subsequently cut out. Certificate of entry on population register of foreigners in Belgium. Belgian coat of arms on front cover, red diagonal stripe running length of verso. Document issued in Schaerbeek on January 20, 1939, valid until July 18, 1939. Renewed twice at 6-month increments - on July 19, 1939 until January 18, 1940, and on January 18, 1940, until July 18, 1940. Narrative: Document was donated by Eudice Bauer, the wife of Gustave Bauer. Gustave was born in 1924 in Hamburg, Germany, and was on vacation in Denmark with his mother Anna and brother Werner when the Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were passed. They decided not to return to Germany, and went to stay with Anne's sister in Brussels, Belgium. Gustave's father Manfred was arrested for smuggling money out of Germany and spent the next two years in prison. Manfred joined his family in Brussels when he was released from prison in 1937. In 1940, immediately before Germany occupied Belgium, all German males born before 1924 were ordered to register. Manfred and Werner were sent to France, where they were interned. On their way to France to join them, Gustave and his mother were arrested and sent to England on the last boat to leave Belgium before it was occupied. In England, Gustave spent time in Folkestone, Pentonville Prison, Kempton Park, and Douglas, Isle of Man. He was in England from May 19 to July 4, 1940. IOn July 4, 1940 he was sent to Canada on the S.S. Sobiesky with other German nationals as prisoners of war.He was in Camp T, in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, from July 15 to August 12, 1940. He was thenmoved to Camp B, in New Brunswick, and then in 1941 was sent with other Jewish internees to Camp I, Île aux Noix, Quebec. He was sponsored for release in 1942, and his mother joined him in Canada in 1947. His father was deported from Drancy to Majdanek in 1943. It is unknown what happened to Gustave's brother Werner once he was sent to France. Neither man survived the war.
Accession No.
2011X.49.15
Name Access
Bauer, Eudice
Places
Schaerbeek, Belgium, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76470
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Blue: Orange ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 19,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Blue: Orange ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 19,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
August 10, 1942-August 11, 1942
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Polish
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Form has been left blank on verso. Folded once vertically and once horizonally. Document is a transportation identification card for Polish labourers entering Germany. Document is for Karol Barszczy?ski, and lists the date of his recruitment as August 10, 1942. He is to report back the next morning, at 8:00 on August 11, 1942, to be sent to Germany as an agricultural worker. He is reminded to bring his identity papers, sturdy shoes, and food for 2 days. Narrative: The donor, Aba Beer, under the false identity of Karol Stefan Barszczy?ski, worked in Eastern Prussia from 1942-1944 as a Polish forced laborer. This allowed him to escape Nazi-occupied Lwów during the 'Great Aktion' in the ghetto, when between 50 000 and 60 000 Jews were killed or deported to Be??ec. Aba was born in 1922 in Bielsko, Poland. In 1939, he moved east with his parents and sister, settling in Przemy?l. In the summer of 1942, he was included on a transport of 1000 Jews to work as slave labourers in the Janowska concentration camp, near Lviv. He escaped and pretending to be Polish, volunteered to go to Germany as a labourer. He worked in a restaurant in East Prussia until January 1944, when he was arrested for not wearing his badge. He was imprisoned in a castle in Ragnit, and then interned in a prisoner-of-war camp for Russian soldiers. He escaped the camp, joined the Polish partisans as a member of the Home Army (Armia Krajowa), and was liberated in Hela, May 1945.
Accession No.
2014.05.04
Name Access
Beer, Jeffrey
Places
Lviv, Lvov (Lemberg), Ukraine, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76481
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Handwritten, Stamped, : Ink : Beige, Red, Black, Grey ; Ht: 13 cm x W: 10 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Handwritten, Stamped, : Ink : Beige, Red, Black, Grey ; Ht: 13 cm x W: 10 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
May 23, 1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
German
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once horizontally. Document is a D. P. identification card for Majer Abramowicz, issued at Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp. Top half of recto contains particulars of cardholder, including fingerprint of right thumb at centre right. Bottom half of recto contains particulars of issuance, including signature of position of UNRRA Official. On verso, instructions printed in English and German. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.06
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Feldafing, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76482
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Typed, Handwritten : Ink : Pink, b&w, Grey, Purple ; Ht: 13 cm x W: 8,75 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Typed, Handwritten : Ink : Pink, b&w, Grey, Purple ; Ht: 13 cm x W: 8,75 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1949-05-02]
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once horizontally. Document is an identity card for Mayer Abramowicz, issued by Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp. Square b&w photograph of cardholder affixed at top left corner with one metal grommet. Document attests that cardholder was born on November 10, 1914 in Wilna, is stateless, was imprisoned in Stutthof and Dachau concentration camps, and had the number 34063 tattooed on his left arm. Last two letters of family name corrected by hand in blue ink. Stamps indicate that cardholder was part of the leadership of the D.P. Camp. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.07
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Feldafing, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76483
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Pink, b&w, Blue ; Ht: 10,25 x W: 14
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Pink, b&w, Blue ; Ht: 10,25 x W: 14
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1949-05-02]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Yiddish
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once vertically to create four panels. On verso, left panel, Yiddish text printed on top and bottom. In centre, insignia of an ornate harp. On recto, left panel, square b&w photograph of cardholder affixed with one staple. Signature underneath. Yiddish printed text on right panel with additions written by hand. Document is a membership card for the 'Amchu' artists' group, attached to the Jewish Labour Committee, issued to Mayer Abramowicz. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.08
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76487
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Typed, Stamped : Ink : Beige, Black, Blue ; Ht: 7,5 cm x W: 13 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Cardboard : Printed, Typed, Stamped : Ink : Beige, Black, Blue ; Ht: 7,5 cm x W: 13 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
May 02, 1949
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Document is a tourist class immigration identification card for Mayer Abramowicz. Name of ship M/V "Sobieski" stamped on it. On left side of card is space for Medical Examination Stamp, left blank. Ink stamp on right sde of card in space for Civil Examination Stamp. On verso, instructions are printed in 12 languages Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.12
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

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