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ZARKOWER, Leon

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/genealogy101955
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
Record Source
JIAS Montreal Client Cards
Fonds No.
I0037
Series No.
R
File No.
27-1802
Restrictions
Due to privacy laws, access to further information about this record is restricted. You may contact CJCCCNA to learn more.
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Repository
Canadian Jewish Archives
Less detail

Steinberg/Rafman Families Fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn16734
Collection
Steinberg/Rafman Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
5.0cm textual records ; 28 photographs
Fonds No.
1066
Scope and Content
The Fonds consists of correspondence with Lily Rafman (nee Steinberg), her wedding notes, her journal pages, a number of legal documents, some newspaper clippings and stock certificates about Steinberg’s, and family photographs. There are three series present within the Fonds. Series I cover…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Steinberg/Rafman Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
5.0cm textual records ; 28 photographs
Scope and Content
The Fonds consists of correspondence with Lily Rafman (nee Steinberg), her wedding notes, her journal pages, a number of legal documents, some newspaper clippings and stock certificates about Steinberg’s, and family photographs. There are three series present within the Fonds. Series I covers Lily Rafman’s personal papers. It includes correspondence. Series II is in regards to Steinberg’s store. Series III contains photographs of both the Rafman and the Steinberg families.
Date
1906-1990
Fonds No.
1066
Storage Location
Bay 6
6-4C
History Biographical
Hyman Rafman The son of Max Rafman and Sarah Rabinovich, Hyman Rafman was born on November 20, 1906. On June 4, 1939, he married Lily Steinberg. He passed away on January 31, 1974. Lily Rafman (nee Steinberg) The daughter of Vilmos Sternberg (later known as William Steinberg) and Ida Roth, Lily Steinberg was born in 1909. As a child, she helped her mother run the family business (Steinberg’s Stores). In 1931, after her brother Sam had taken over the family business, she and her mother started up a small shop on Monkland Street in Montreal, where she worked and lived until her marriage in 1939. She and Hyman Rafman had four children, Sandra, Nancy, Marlene and Mark. Steinberg’s Ida Roth was born in 1884. In 1902, she married William Steinberg (an arranged marriage). They had six children: Jack (1903), Sam (1905), Nathan (1908), Lily (1909), Max (1912), and Morris (1914). On her own, Ida herself started a small grocery store in 1917 in order to provide for her family. It was on St. Lawrence Boulevard in Montreal, and was quite successful. All family members helped out around the store, but young Sam Steinberg quickly emerged as a retail prodigy. He began opening new stores around Montreal. In 1930, he incorporated the company, calling it “Steinberg’s Service Stores Ltd.” The first self-service outlet was opened in 1933, and a “Wholesale Grocereria” (offering limited service but drastically-discounted prices) opened its doors in 1934. There was a great expansion in the 1950s, where Steinberg’s opened up many outlets all over the province, not just in Montreal.
Custodial History
Donated by Sharon Steinberg (daughter of Jack Steinberg and Gertrude Dover) and Nancy Rafman (daughter of Hyman Rafman and Lily Steinberg).
Notes
All photographs entered in the JPL Photograph Database.
Subjects
Steinberg family
Steinberg Foods, Ltd.
Steinberg, Sam, 1905-1978
Washmor Frocks Co. (Montreal, Quebec)
Steinberg, Ida, 1884-1946
Steinberg, Jack, 1903-
Steinberg, Max, 1912-
Steinberg, Nathan, 1908
Rafman family
Rafman, Lily (nee Steinberg)
Textile industry
Trout Lake (Laurentians, Quebec)
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Levy Family Fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn75288
Collection
Levy Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Fonds No.
1294
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Levy Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Fonds No.
1294
Storage Location
JPL
History Biographical
Harold and Eva Levy, long-time residents of Cote St-Luc, were active community members. Mr. Levy began his career as a tailor. He later went on to manufacturing children's outwear. Items in the collection reflect the history of manufacturing in Montreal, such as the W&W pedal sewing machine. Other notable items include the 'pearly outfits' (which were costumes made for a charity event), with buttons hand sewn into elaborate designs by the Levys and their friends. The Levys were also part of the original founders of the Beth Zion congregation in Cote St-Luc. The first cheder for the congregation was held in the Levy home. Mr. Levy was also a member of the Pipe Smokers' Club of Montreal. Mr. Levy served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II.
Accession No.
12-019
Subjects
Levy Family
Levy, Eva (nee Bercovitch)
Levy, Harold Robert
Veterans, Jewish
World War, 1939-1945 - Veterans
World War, 1939-1945
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Benditsky Family Fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn75323
Collection
Benditsky Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.17m of multiple media
Fonds No.
1295
Scope and Content
The Fonds consists of correspondence, photographs and ephemera related to the war time relationship and marriage of Nathan and Ruth Benditsky. The material focuses predominently on the years 1945 and 1946, during which the couple organizes their Manchester wedding and arranges Ruth's eventual immig…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Benditsky Family Fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
0.17m of multiple media
Scope and Content
The Fonds consists of correspondence, photographs and ephemera related to the war time relationship and marriage of Nathan and Ruth Benditsky. The material focuses predominently on the years 1945 and 1946, during which the couple organizes their Manchester wedding and arranges Ruth's eventual immigration to Canada.
Date
[between 1920 and 1985] predominent 1945-1946
Fonds No.
1295
Storage Location
JPL
Creator
Ruth Benditsky Nathan Benditsky
Conservation
Photographs and negatives found among the textual material were placed into acid-free envelopes. A single film roll was cut for preservation and placed in flat 35mm negative files.
History Biographical
Nathan Benditsky was born in Montreal on June 28th, 1918. He was one of six children born to Israel and Esther Benditsky who had emigrated from Russia in 1908. After beginning to work in family's textile trimmings business, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941 along with his two brothers Samuel and Rubin. Soon stationed overseas, he met Ruth Schrager and in October 1945, the two married in Manchester, England. Travelling back to Canada in 1946, Nathan Benditsky returned to the family business, Star Pleating Inc. Nathan ran the company alongisde his brother Samuel and father, Israel. The business continued into the late 1990's moving from Rue Alymer to Mount-Royal Avenue. Ruth Benditsky (nee Schrager) was born on May 10th, 1927 in Vienna. Her parents Mortiz and Rachel Schrager, and sister Mirjam Zimmerman (nee Schrager) moved to England in 1937. After marrying, Ruth Benditsky waited a number of months before recieving her travel arrangements from the Canadian Wives' Bureau. Alongside thousands of other women, she immigrated to Canada in July 1946. Numerous relationships were initiated during World War II between Canadian military personnel and citizens living in areas where the military was stationed. Though such relationships were officially discouraged by the military, many nonetheless resulted in marriage. In 1946 the majority of newly-wed women, and some men, travelled to Canada to join their partners following the war. The estimated 48,000 war brides that made the transatlantic trip represented a significant influx of new immigrants from Britian, as well as the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Italy and Germany. Once Ruth and Nathan Benditsky were reunited in Montreal, they worked to bring Ruth's family to North America. Moritz and Rachel Schrager, as well as Ruth's grandmother, Rivka Monath, settled in Montreal in the late 1940's. Ruth and Nathan Benditsky raised three children, Howard Benditsky, Suzan Baron and Naomi Benditsky. Ruth Benditsky died in 1980, survived by Nathan Benditsky, who died in 1999.
Language
English
Custodial History
This material was donated to the Jewish Public Library Archives by the Benditsky Family in 2012. The material of the Fonds was in the possesion of Nathan Benditsky until his death in 1999.
Notes
The Bendisky Family Fonds was initially recieved "unsorted". In October 2012 the fonds was physically arranged to reflect the Fonds' series, as no disernable original order could be established.
Access Restriction
Material in the Benditsky Fonds is restricted to researchers with academic affiliation. Please contact the Jewish Public Library Archives for further information.
Subjects
Benditsky Family Fonds
War brides
World War, 1939-1945
Military Personnel -- Canada.
Royal Canadian Air Force
Textile industry -- Canada.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Jewish Public Library Archives
Less detail

Monson Family fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn86610
Collection
Monson Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Fonds No.
I0173
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of: Family photograph; death certificate.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Monson Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of: Family photograph; death certificate.
Date
1911-1926
Fonds No.
I0173
History Biographical
Harry Monson was born around 1881 in Russia. Hary married Baila Monson and they had 3 daughters: Mildred Monson (Mildred Korn), Betty Monson (Betty Goldwater), and Jean Monson (Jean Kushin). Harry Monson was president of the Ottawa Hebrew Benifit Society. He died September 4, 1926.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Ottawa Jewish Archives
Less detail

Cardash Family Fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn86721
Collection
Cardash Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
Photographs, textual material, 1 artifact, 2 books
Fonds No.
I0040
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a large number of photographs; Moe Cardash's diploma from a fur designing, fitting and grading course in New York City, April 1948; A fur catalogue book made for the tailoring and furrier store; Envelope, containg postcards from people writing to thank Moe for his fur creations…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Cardash Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
Photographs, textual material, 1 artifact, 2 books
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a large number of photographs; Moe Cardash's diploma from a fur designing, fitting and grading course in New York City, April 1948; A fur catalogue book made for the tailoring and furrier store; Envelope, containg postcards from people writing to thank Moe for his fur creations; A folder of photos of Moe's various fur creations as well as his vendor stall set-up's that were once contained in the fur catalogue book also in the collection. They were removed and stored seperately to prevent further damage to the photos; Moses Cardash's Pocket Address Book; A folder of photographs of Bess Cardash's plays being acted out by Jewish Sunday School children; A newspaper article showing Bess Cardash and her fellow actors (see 1-1168); A file of Bess Cardash's plays, scripts and writings; A file with Moe Cardash's diploma from a Retail Selling course from Algonquin College - 1968, Moe's C.V - undated, an article written on Moe from the Perley Health Care Foundation where Moe spent his last years - 2010; Miscellaneous: Advertisements for Cardash Creation Furs, Littman Cardash's business card from 358 Rideau, A City of Ottawa pass for Moses Cardash - 1992, A vendor's permit for L. Cardash Furs - 1963, An application for a vendor's permit - 1963, An article from the L'Chayim newspaper on Moses Bilsky, A vendor's permit - 1981, Two pamphlets on Cardash Creation Furs and their wares for sale, A sales Tax License - 1959, A magazine photo showing two R.C.A.F. events, Bess (Bessie) Cardash's Upper School Examination report card along with a letter from the Civil Service Commission complying with Bessie's request for the report card which she sent to them along with an application for the position of Laboratory Assistant in the Department of Pensions and National Health - 1940, a blueprint of the Friel Street row houses (with the Cardash family home at 226 Friel) - 1964, Two sheets of L. Cardash Tailor and Furrier stationary (one has a notation that Bess wrote their motto at the bottom of the page, "A Cardash creation is a capital creation", a letter of reference from the Bank of Nova Scotia to the United States Consul introducing Moses Cardash as a successful merchant and a man of good standing and should be eligible for a Visa to remain in the US for a few months in order to take a fur design class in New York - 1946, A Jewish War Veteran of Canada membership card for Moe Cardash - 2007/2008; An envelope of colour photos from an early morning Minyan group from Beth Shalom synagogue. Some of the figures can be seen wearing "Irving Rivers" aprons with slogans on them (unscanned); An envelope of colour photos from an early morning Minyan group from Beth Shalom along with Moe's and Issie Rose's Birthday party with the group. Moe was turning 83 which makes this 2006. Envelope includes a CD and negatives - 2006; An envelope of various photos (unscanned). Includes two photos of Rabbi Bulka in Israel posing with Moe Cardash; An envelope of various photos of Moe and the Veterans Association (unscanned). A book called Personal Policy Making: Canada's role in the adoption of the Palestine partition resolution - 2002; A book called Secret Societies and Resistant Movements in the Fertile Crescent 1875-1920 - 1994; Funeral Memorial Gestbooks for both Cayla and Littman Cardash. 3 photo albums; A folder containing various envelopes of photographs of the Cardash Family - 1960's -60 colour photographs, Cardash Family, Littman, Cayla (Greenberg), Lillian Cardash , Bess Cardash (Lewis), Phillip Lewis, Bruce Lewis, Marshall Lewis, Zev Lewis, Moe Cardash, Yehuda (Eddie) Cardash – 1960-1966; - Photographs, 25 Colour and B/W Photos, Cardash Family; -19 colour photographs, Cardash Family, Cayla (Greenberg), Marshal Lewis, Bruce Lewis, Zev lewis, Bess Cardash (Greenberg), Phillip Lewis, Eddie (Yehuda) Cardash – 1960’s; -7 Colour Photographs, negatives Demolishion of Cardash Home; -38 Colour Photographs, Moe Cardash, Bess Lewis, Phillip Lewis, Littman Cardash; -28 Colour and B/W photographs, Littman and Cayla Wedding, Cayla (Greenberg), Littman Cardash, Bess Lewis (Cardash), Phillip Lewis, Bruce Lewis, Zev Lewis, Marshall Lewis;
Date
1940-2010
Fonds No.
I0040
History Biographical
Littman Cardash and Cayla Greenberg came to Canada from Russia. They had four children together; Bess (Bessie) Cardash (m. Phillip Lewis), Lillian (Lily) Cardash, Rabbi Yehuda Cardash and Moses (Moe) Cardash, (children not listed in order of birth). Cayla came from Soviet Russia and eventually sponsored her sister Niome (also appeas as Norma/Naomi) Greenberg to join her here in 1927. Cayla Cardash passed away in 1972. Moe was born on February 18, 1923 in Ottawa. When WWII broke out he enlisted and became an instrument mechanic for the RCAF. Upon his return obtained his diploma from the American-Mitchell Sol Vogel Designing School in New York. he graduated in April 1948 then returned to Ottawa were he began working as a furrier and tailor. He opened a shop at 390 Dalhousie Street and then later moved to 358 Rideau Street. Moe was very well known for his artistic works in fur, and would create elaborate designs and wall hangings. Moe never married or had children. Bess was born in Russia prior to the family's immigration. She was well known for her theater work and play writing. She directed several plays with the Ottawa Jewish Sunday School children. Lily eventually moved to Washington, D.C.
Notes
1. The following is a transcript from an interview Moses Cardash did with a veteran's website called The Memory Project in 2011 - http://www.thememoryproject.com/stories/2207:moses-cardash/ "My father was in the First World War and he was in the Russian Army. He was a prisoner in Germany and he came all the way back to Russia, to his hometown. And my sister was born in Russia, Bessie. And the Russians came into the town, you know, the Red Bolsheviks, you know. And they came in, they saw my father with his boots and he took up the tailor trade and he wore a nice [indicating suit]. They said, “Are you with us or against us?” And my father was there with the guns, you know, says “I’m with you.” So he says, “Alright, take your jacket off and take off your boots.” And the guy put them on and he [Moses' father] says, “But I’m with you.” But the other guy says, “I’m here longer than you are, I needed a pair of shoes, boots.” And I liked the [Royal Canadian] Air Force because I knew the air force procedure. I liked the uniform, I liked the outfit they used to come in in the morning, they had a parade there. Everybody was in uniform. Some of my friends were joining up. And I went down on Queen Street [in Ottawa], they had the recruitment. It was a nice little building that just made on Queen Street and you come in there and the doctor would examine you and give you an eye test and he’d check your eyes. He says, go down to the exhibition on Bank Street and the army was there. And you walk in there and there was, like the cattle used to be there before, you know what I mean, and there was a place where you sat down but when you went to the RCAF recruiting centre, it was all modern. There was a general from the first contingent and they needed men and he says, “What do you see?” I said, “I see the big E blurred.” He says, “Take your glasses off, what do you see?” I said, “I don’t see anything.” He says, “Put your glasses on and read the article.” And I read the last line, “Made in Canada,” yeah. He says, “Your eyesight is good, report Monday morning” – this was on a Friday – “report Monday morning at the Ottawa station, you’re going to Toronto, you’re going into the army.” Listen, I ate, it was strictly kosher when I came from this. It was the first time I was ever away from home. When I went to the Jackson building, that was the first time I had toast and coffee and I used to eat in the morning. I used to go downstairs and get the breakfast for the girls." 2. Moe's obituary: "Peacefully at Perley & Rideau Veteran's Centre, on Thursday, November 8th, 2012 at the age of 89. Beloved brother of Bessie C. Lewis (Phillip), Lillian Cardash and the late Rabbi Dr. Yehuda Cardash (Esther). Loving son of the late Littman and Kayla Cardash. Devoted uncle of Marshall, Bruce and Zev Lewis and Aaron, Berish and Dina Cardash. Loyal and caring friend of Martin (Moishe Avraham) Vaillancourt. A Graveside Service will be held at the Jewish Memorial Gardens, 2692 Bank Street, Ottawa on Friday, November 9th at 1 p.m. Shiva to be observed at 44-450 Daly Ave. from Sunday to Wednesday from 2 to 5 p.m. Moe was a dedicated and proud member of Beth Shalom Congregation." 3. The Cardash, Kardish and Cardish families are all related, and stems from brothers immigrating at different times and receiving different spellings of their last names upon arrival. Yehuda was also known as Eddie Cardash.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Ottawa Jewish Archives
Less detail

Ain Family fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn86797
Collection
Ain Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Fonds No.
I0011
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of: A newspaper article on Ain's from the Ottawa Citizen - November 1, 1975; A printout of an email where Susan discusses some family history - September 27, 2011; A printout of an email where Susan discusses a 1945 letter written by her grandfather's brother, Eli Ain, where he re…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Ain Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of: A newspaper article on Ain's from the Ottawa Citizen - November 1, 1975; A printout of an email where Susan discusses some family history - September 27, 2011; A printout of an email where Susan discusses a 1945 letter written by her grandfather's brother, Eli Ain, where he relates some family history - October 14, 2011;
Fonds No.
I0011
Storage Location
Individual Collections
History Biographical
David Ain came to Ottawa from the Balkans as a boy, and set up a dry goods store in the town of Elgin, Ontario, before moving to Smiths Falls and starting Ain's - a dry goods and menswear store. David had a brother named Eli Ain (Eliyohu Ain) who lived in Carleton Place. He never married. David had another brother Mottel Ain (Max Ain?) who lived in Ottawa. Mottel's wife was from Montreal and they had three children together. David met his wife Judy Ain (nee Judy Wiseman, Judith Wiseman) there, whose father owned the only other dry goods store in Smiths Falls at the time - A. Wiseman's Men's and Boy's Wear. Judy's father came to Canada as a boy in 1908, also from the Black Sea area. David and Judy had a son, Kenneth Ain (Ken Ain) who left to fight in World War II, but returned in 1944 and bought the store from his father. David Ain opened a smaller store in Brockville but later retired to Montreal where his wife and other relatives were from, where he spent the rest of his life. People for a long time called Kenneth "Davey" after his father. Kenneth died in 1970 and his wife Judy took over running the store for the next five years. Five years to the day of the death of her husband, she sold the store to a man named Jack Clements. David and Judy also had a daughter named Ruth Ain (Ruth Lithwick) of Montreal. Kenneth had a daughter named Susan Ain (Susan Kriger).
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Ottawa Jewish Archives
Less detail

Vineberg Family fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn86800
Collection
Vineberg Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Fonds No.
I0240
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Vineberg Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Fonds No.
I0240
Storage Location
Individual Files
History Biographical
The following information comes from a number of typed pages of information from Harris Vineberg (Chiam Nachman Vineberg), who wrote a family history in 1935: The name Vineberg is of German origin but the Vineberg family itself does not have any definite information to say that their ancestors were from there. However, Harris himself knew that his own grandfather (Solomon Vineberg), and father, did business in German exporting lumber and flaxseed (linseed). These men used to ship their goods out of a summer port in a city in Poland called Kovna. Solomon Vineberg (b.1799 - d. 1869) was married to a very strong woman named Tzimka (Tzimka Vineberg). As Harris described it, she must have been very popular because her husband and her brothers went by her name. Even in the 1930's Harris says you could still find people who called themselves Yankel Simkis, or Abraham Simkis, referring to her as a matriarch. Solomon and Tzimka had four children: Leah Vineberg, Elijah Vineberg, Eleazer Vineberg (or Lazarus Vineberg), and Chia Nacha Vineberg. Eleazer / Lazarus was Harris' father. His mother was Naloa Vineberg. They had at one point eleven children - seven sons and four daughters. The youngest was Rebecca who died at the age of two, but all ten others lived to adulthood. The eldest was Samuel Vineberg, then Hyman Vineberg, Malcom Vineberg, Israel Vineberg, Harris Vineberg, Shayna Rachel Vineberg (name only written in Hebrew, could be incorrect), Dvorah Vineberg (name only written in Hebrew, could be incorrect), Lyon Vineberg, Archie Vineberg, Charles Vineberg, Hattie Vineberg. When Tzimka died, Solomon couldn't bring himself to marry again even though he was young. He focused his attentions thereafter on his youngest daugter and when she passed away at a young age he became very broken up. He passed away in 1869 at age 70. Harris came to Montreal in 1872 after being smuggled out of Lithuania. His three older bothers had already left the same way and when he was 15 it came to be his own turn. He dressed in girl's clothing and a sympathetic Lithuanian friend drove him by horse and cart over the border and into Germany. He was delivered over to a fair-haired German man and he climbed into the man's cart after changing out of the girl's clothing. The man took him to his own house where the man's wife made him warm and comfortable. Two days later the German man had taken him to Hamburg where he was put on a ship traveling to Canada. On the ship, Harris shared a cabin with 16 year old boy who mocked him for praying with his talit (prayer shawl) and phylacteries. The next day he rose very early and prayed in a quiet corner on the top deck. Unknown to him, the Captain of the ship was watching him. When the Captain asked him what he was doing Chaim explained, and then the man insisted he start sharing his own cabin. So he spent the rest of the trip living in the Captain's quarters. He disembarked in Montreal and soon thereafter, he entered into various business ventures with moderate success until he established H. Vineberg & Co. in 1892. Clothing manufactured by this Montreal firm under its "Progress" brand label, was well received by the public. Mr. Vineberg was an active member in the Montreal Jewish community and its benevolent associations, including the Baron de Hirsch Institute. Harris' son (??) was Joseph H. Vineberg of Montreal who helped to start the Larocque Department Store, Ottawa's only francophone department store, on the corner of Rideau and Dalhousie. Joseph and his wife were living in Montreal before they moved to Ottawa in 1931. The store seems to have been started by a man named J. Alphonse Larocque in 1923. In 1931/1932 Joseph Vineberg seems to have come in from Montreal to take over as manager. In 1933 Joseph is then listed as Owner and Director. He continued in this capacity until 1967, when other family members took over. The store was closed in 1971. The building that housed the store was originally built as the headquarters of the R.C.M.P. before it became Laroque's. It was added to in 1930 at first by W. E. Noffke, and then renovated and expanded greatly by Barry Padolsky Associates Inc. Architects from 1989 to 1993 and as of 2014 it is still known as Mercury Court. Features include the "flying Mercury" weathervane which adorned the Sun Life Insurance Building at Bank and Sparks Streets from 1898 until 1949. Joseph's wife was Frances Vineberg (nee Frances Levy) (b. England, 1889 - d. Ottawa, July 21, 1957). They had three children together: Lita-Rose Vineberg (married Irving Betcherman - October 6, 1946), Nordau Vineberg, Lloyd Vineberg (b. 1916 - d. Ottawa, March 12, 2001).
Notes
1. From Lloyd Vineburg's obituary: Following a brief illness Lloyd passed away on Monday, March 12, 2001 at the age of 85. He will be remembered for a lifetime of devotion to his family and service to his community. Lloyd was educated at Queen's University (B.Comm) and Harvard University (M.B.A.) following which he joined the family business, Larocque Department Store. At the outbreak of WWII he joined the RCAF, where he rose to the rank of Squadron Leader. After the war, he returned to Larocque's, which his father had now entrusted to him and his brother, Nordau. He soon became deeply involved in Community Affairs. He was a member of the Ottawa Board of Trade (Chairman of the Dept. Store Group); Better Business Bureau of Ottawa (President 1965); Kiwanis Club of Ottawa (President 1958 - 1959); Chairman, Community Chest (United Way) Annual Campaign (1957); Director, United Way of Ottawa- Carleton (President 1964 - 1966); founding member, Granite Curling Club of West Ottawa (President 1958 - 1959); member, Governor- General's Curling Club; member, Advisory Vocational Committee of the Ottawa Collegiate Board (1963 - 1965); founding trustee, Riverside Hospital of Ottawa (Vice-Chairman of the Board 1964 - 1969 and 1975 - 1979, Chairman of the Board 1969 - 1975); Director, Canadian Hospital Association; Director, Ontario Hospital Association; Director, Canadian Council on Hospital Accreditation (Chairman 1976 - 1978); member, Ottawa Area Legal Aid Committee (1975 - 1985); and the Riverside Hospital Foundation (Chairman 1982 - 1984). Lloyd is predeceased by his dear wife, Betty (1992) whom he married in 1940. He is survived by his sons Peter and Robert (Patricia), his grandchildren Noah, Daniel and Andrew Vineberg and Anthony McNally and his sister Lita-Rose Betcherman (Irving). Also predeceased by his brother Nordau. Lloyd's friends are invited to join his family in a Celebration of his life on Saturday, March 17, 2001 at 1:00 p.m. at the Amberwood Golf and Country Club (54 Springbrook Drive, Stittsville). If so desired, in memory of Lloyd, donations to the United Way of Ottawa- Carleton (106 Colonnade Road N., Nepean,) would be appreciated. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Cole Funeral Services. Ottawa Citizen, March 14, 2001 2. The family history of the Vinebergs located within the collection is much more extensive than repeated here. 3. In the book, "Canada's Jews: A People's Journey" by Gerald Tulchinsky, on page 95 there is a very small line that states that Harris Vineberg was once a peddler in the Ottawa Valley, before he started his clothing business in Montreal in 1882, manufacturing men's and boy's suits under the "Progressive Brand Co." The Archives, however, has not seen any other mentions of Harris ever having lived in Ottawa for a time after he arrived in Montreal off the boat from Europe.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Ottawa Jewish Archives
Less detail

Kriger Family fonds

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn86804
Collection
Kriger Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Fonds No.
I0139
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of: A newspaper article on Diane Kriger winning a 1950's Ottawa Jewish Bulletin "Beautiful Baby" contest; A ritual shoichet knife used by Max Movshovitz when he was a shoichet in Carleton Place; Two email printouts discussing Kriger family history - 2011/2012; A letter in Yiddish…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Kriger Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of: A newspaper article on Diane Kriger winning a 1950's Ottawa Jewish Bulletin "Beautiful Baby" contest; A ritual shoichet knife used by Max Movshovitz when he was a shoichet in Carleton Place; Two email printouts discussing Kriger family history - 2011/2012; A letter in Yiddish along with its translation. The letter was used to wrap up the shoichet knife. It asks for people to come hear a man who witnessed first hand the horrors of a Russian death camp - 1944; A second file with maps, tickets and other souvenirs from Maynard and Shirley from their trip to the USSR - 1989;
Fonds No.
I0139
Storage Location
Individual Collections
History Biographical
Maynard Kriger and his wife Shirley Kriger (nee Shirley Movshovitz) grew up in Carleton Place and Brockville in the Ottawa Valley. In 1989, about a month before the fall of the Berlin Wall, they and another couple, Morton Taller and Sally Taller, took a trip to the USSR and wrote a lengthy article about it for the Ottawa Jewish Bulletin. Maynard and Shirley had a son, David Kriger (b. 1956), who was married to Susan Kriger (nee Susan Ain). Shirley's father Max Movshovitz (b. Yakobovi, Lithuania ca. 1887 - d. 1981) was a merchant in Carleton Place. Max and his wife (b. Gorzdh, Lithuania) would get their kosher meat from Ottawa and it would be delivered by bus or by train. The one exception was poultry which Max slaughtered himself (the Archives has his shoichet knife). This is how it was up until about the 1940's. Max has a shoichet's certificate (now lost) in Yiddish which he received from his local yeshiva in Lithuania some time before he came to North America through Ellis Island ca. 1910. The Movshovitz's lived in Carleton Place from 1917-1976.
Notes
1. When the shoichet knife was donated to the Archives it was wrapped in a typed Yiddish letter inviting all who wanted to, to come to a Montreal synagogue to listen to an eye witness from the Holocaust tell of the horrors he has seen first-hand - 1944. 2. Diane Kriger was the posthumous author of a book called, "Sex Rewarded, Sex Punished."
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Ottawa Jewish Archives
Less detail

Torontow Family fonds.

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn86812
Collection
Torontow Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Fonds No.
I0237
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Torontow Family fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Fonds No.
I0237
Storage Location
vault
History Biographical
The Torontow family were very important and active members of the Jewish community in Ottawa. They owned/operated a hardware store in Downtown Ottawa from 1910 or 1922-1987 called Torontow Hardware. Joe Torontow the father of the family, was a very influential person who was one of founding members of the board of directors of cogregation Beth Shalom, the treasurer of the Chevra Kadisha, a member of Rockliffe Lodge,B'nai B'rith, Ottawa and Montreal Sick Benefit Societies, the Board of Trade, Men's Canadian Club, Ottawa Hebrew Free Loan Society, among others. Sol Torontow, the son of Joe Torontow was elected as a member of the Hadassah Xa-tional Council in 1938. Norman Torontow, the other son of Joe Torontow got married to Stella Gandall in January 27, 1952 at Agudath Achim Congregation. Norman Torontow was appointed president to the Jewish boys softball league in 1953. StelIa and Norman Torontow established the StelIa and Norman Torontow Fund to benefit CZF Teen Summer Program in Israel in 1988.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Ottawa Jewish Archives
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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