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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : handwritten, printed : Graphite pencil : beige, grey, black, red ; Ht: 19,35 cm x W: 21,9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : handwritten, printed : Graphite pencil : beige, grey, black, red ; Ht: 19,35 cm x W: 21,9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Hungarian
Notes
1 page, double-sized, folded horizontally and vertically. Recto addressed to "Weinberger Gustav". Telegram message handwritten in pencil and signed "apa" [trad.: father]. At left is a broken paper seal with red Magyar Posta insignia. Verso contains printed information about the Pesti Magyar Kereskedelmi Bank. Narrative: Donor is Elaine Kalman Naves, daughter of Gustav and Anikó Weinberger. Kalman Weinberger (1881-1944) was Gustav's father. Kalman was killed in Auschwitz in 1944. This collection of correspondence was used as part of the research for the following book: Kalman Naves, Elaine. Journey to Vaja: Reconstructing the World of a Hungarian-Jewish Family. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1996. Print.
Accession No.
2014.01.40
Name Access
Kalman Naves, Elaine
Places
Hungary, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, White, Red, Blue, Green ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 20 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, White, Red, Blue, Green ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 20 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 21, 1949
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once horizontally and once vertically. Printed on letterhead of Canadian National Telegraphs, logo inside oversized 'C' is a maple leaf with a rectangular sign in centre reading 'Canadian National'. Three small beige maple leafs on right side of logo. Top quarter of page is maroon with beige letters and details, the rest of the page is beige. Text from telegraph is blue, printed on lighter beige strips of paper. Document is a telegram to Bella Herling from Helen and Jack, congratulating her on her wedding and expressing regret that they cannot attend. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.03
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : White, Blue, Beige, Multicoloured ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 20 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : White, Blue, Beige, Multicoloured ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 20 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 25, 1949
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once horizontally and once vertically. 'Canadian National Telegraphs' printed in blue at bottom centre of page. Top third of page is blue with image of a card that says 'Greetings' in centre, surrounded by symbols of special occasions, such as wedding rings, a diploma, a calendar, luggage, a birthday cake, etc. On verso, date is stamped twice. Document is a telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Sol Kurek and their son, wishing Mr. and Mrs. Max Abrahamowitz congratulations on their wedding. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.04
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Toronto, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, Blue, Yellow, Black ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 21,25 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, Blue, Yellow, Black ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 21,25 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 25, 1949
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Top quarter of page is blue, 'A Social Telegram via Canadian Pacific' printed in yellow letters with image of a woman in formal dress on left and a bouquet of roses on right, also both in yellow. Document is a telegram from the Gingerhut [likely an error, should read Fingerhut] family to Mr. and Mrs. Abramovitz, congratulating them on their wedding. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.05
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : beige, black ; Ht: 13 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : beige, black ; Ht: 13 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 02, 1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
One page typewritten in black ink from Serge Philipson to S. Sapiro in Portugal . Serge Philipson is trying to get news of his daughter, wife and family. Narrative: During the war, the father of Rachel Levy, Serge Philipson, was working in Galway, Ireland in a factory of Les Modes Modernes which he co-owned with Henri, his brother-in-law. He wasn't able to see Rachel until the end of the war. During the war he tried to reach friends and family to have news and help Rachel and his wife Sophie.
Accession No.
2002.08.004
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Dublin, Ireland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 12,8 cm x W: 18,8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 12,8 cm x W: 18,8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
August 10, 1944
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
English
Notes
One page, double-sided. Informations on front. Filled form telegram with circular ink stamp on top right dated of August 10 1944. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.023
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Tel Aviv, Israel, Asia
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 13,2 cm x W: 20,2 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 13,2 cm x W: 20,2 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
English
Notes
One page, double-sided. Informations on front. Filled form telegram with circular ink stamp on top right dated of October 9 1942. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.024
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige, blue ; Ht: 12,6 cm x W: 20,6 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige, blue ; Ht: 12,6 cm x W: 20,6 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
October 22, 1942
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
English
Notes
One page. Typewritten in blue ink. Personnal letter to Henri from Serge Philipson. Writes about Visa. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.026
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Dublin, Ireland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige, blue ; Ht: 25,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige, blue ; Ht: 25,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
October 03, 1942
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
One page. Typewritten in blue ink. Personal letter from Serge Philipson from wife Sophie Philipson about Visa. Narrative: Serge Philipson was in Ireland the whole time of the war to take care of business les Modes Modernes. Wife Sophie Philipson was with family and daugther Rachel Levy in France. At one point she was sent to Drancy and died.
Accession No.
2002.08.027
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Dublin, Ireland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige, blue ; Ht: 12,6 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Telegram : Paper : Beige, blue ; Ht: 12,6 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
October 30, 1942
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
English
Notes
One page. Typewritten in blue ink. Personal letter from Serge Philipson to Henri Orbach. Writes his wife (Sophie Philipson) transit Visa. Narrative: Henri Orbach was the brother-in-law of Serge Philipson. He was the brother of Sophie Philipson and the uncle of Rachel Levy (donor). He owned the compagny les Modes Modernes with Serge. He died in the war abnd Sophie Philipson as well.
Accession No.
2002.08.029
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Dublin, Ireland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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