Skip header and navigation

Refine Results By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 27,5 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 27,5 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1943]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
I page, single-sided. Folded once horizontally and once vertically. Ink blotches at bottom of cast list. Document is a listing of cast members for a performance of Oliver Cromwell, a play by John Drinkwater. Performance was held in an internment camp. Gustave plays 'First Agent to the Earl of Bedford', and Leopold Loebenberg, another internee who later settled in Montreal, plays 'General Fairfax'. Narrative: This document was donated by Eudice Bauer, the wife of Gustave Bauer. Gustave was born in 1924 in Hamburg, Germany, and was on vacation in Denmark with his mother Anna and brother Werner when the Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were passed. They decided not to return to Germany, and went to stay with Anne's sister in Brussels, Belgium. Gustave's father Manfred was arrested for smuggling money out of Germany and spent the next two years in prison. Manfred joined his family in Brussels when he was released from prison in 1937. In 1940, immediately before Germany occupied Belgium, all German males born before 1924 were ordered to register. Manfred and Werner were sent to France, where they were interned. On their way to France to join them, Gustave and his mother were arrested and sent to England on the last boat to leave Belgium before it was occupied. In England, Gustave spent time in Folkestone, Pentonville Prison, Kempton Park, and Douglas, Isle of Man. He was in England from May 19 to July 4, 1940. IOn July 4, 1940 he was sent to Canada on the S.S. Sobiesky with other German nationals as prisoners of war.He was in Camp T, in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, from July 15 to August 12, 1940. He was thenmoved to Camp B, in New Brunswick, and then in 1941 was sent with other Jewish internees to Camp I, Île aux Noix, Quebec. He was sponsored for release in 1942, and his mother joined him in Canada in 1947. His father was deported from Drancy to Majdanek in 1943. It is unknown what happened to Gustave's brother Werner once he was sent to France. Neither man survived the war. Leopold Loebenberg was interned in many of the same camps as Gustave. His video testimony is held in the Centre's collection.
Accession No.
2011X.49.06
Name Access
Bauer, Eudice
Places
Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 29,5 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 29,5 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1947-04-17]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Yiddish
Notes
1 horizontal page, folded once vertically to make a four-panel booklet, then folded once horizontally and once vertically. "Amchu" emblem of a harp printed on cover (left panel, verso). Document is a program for a performance of the Dybbuk by the "AMCHO" [aka "Amchu"] artists' group in Feldafing. Maier Abramowicz is part of the cast. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.15
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Feldafing , Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Cardboard : Printed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 18 cm x W: 8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Cardboard : Printed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 18 cm x W: 8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1947-04-17]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Yiddish
Notes
1 vertical page, double-sided. On recto, program for a theatrical presentation is printed. Text is mainly in transliterated Yiddish. Verso is a blank punchcard. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.17
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Feldafing, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program ? : Paper : Printed : Ink : Blue, Black ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 23 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program ? : Paper : Printed : Ink : Blue, Black ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 23 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Yiddish
Notes
1 horizontal page, folded vertically to make a four-panel booklet. Document is likely a program for a theatrical production, certainly related to "Amchu" theater group in Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.18
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35,5 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35,5 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 01, 1950
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided, folded vertically to create four panels, then folded once horizontally. Text on right-hand panels on recto and verso.Left-hand panels blank. Document is the program for a Purim concert, arranged as a tribute to the Jewish Hospital of Hope. Concert included a play, staged by Meir Abramowitz. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.24
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 21,5 cm x W: 28 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 21,5 cm x W: 28 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Yiddish
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once vertically to create two distinct panels, then folded once horizontally and once vertically. Document is the program, most likely for a theatrical presentation. Left panel contains four advertisements, text mainly in English. Right panel is in Yiddish, contains information about the presentation with a numbered list, divided into 2 sections. Left side contains the names of the actors; Mayer Abramovitch appears four times. Narrative: Bella (Beila, Bela) Herling and Mayer (Majer, Meyer, Meir) Abramovitch (Abramovitz, Abramowicz, Abramowitz) were the parents of the donor, Toby Herscovitch. Bella was born in Suchedniów, Poland on September 25, 1925, the youngest of a family of ten children. Her parents and five siblings were murdered in the Holocaust. Bella and three of her sisters survived the war working as slave labourers in an ammunitions factory in Skarzysko-Kamienna. They were liberated by Russian troops on January 16, 1945, and made their way to the Feldafing Displaced Persons Camp, where they reunited with a brother who had survived Auschwitz. Bella volunteered for nursing training by a Jewish refugee agency, and worked as a nurse in the camp from 1946 to 1948. In 1948, she joined her sister Paula in Toronto, where she worked as a nurse's aide and married Mayer, a fellow survivor who she had known from Feldafing. Born November 10, 1914 in Vilna (Vilnius), he was the sole survivor of a family of six children. He lived in the Vilna ghetto and worked in a factory making window panes for German barracks; he was later sent to a labour camp in Tallin, Estonia, and then to Stutthof concentration camp. In the final days of the war, he escaped from a subsequent transfer to Dachau concentration camp and was liberated. He spent three months sick in a hospital and ended up in Feldafing, where he was active in the "Amchu" or "AMCHO" theater group, part of the Jewish Labour Committee. He lived for a year in France, and immigrated to Canada in May, 1949. Bella and Mayer moved to Montreal in 1950 and opened a fabric store. Mayer passed away in 2001, and Bella in 2014.
Accession No.
2014.10.30
Name Access
Herscovitch, Toby
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Program : Paper : Typed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 35 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
May 14, 1967
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
English
Notes
3 pages, single-sided. Document is a program for the Montreal memorial rally commemorating the 22nd anniversary of the liberation of Nazi-occupied Europe. Event organized by the Association of Survivor of Nazi Oppression. Narrative: The Association of Survivors of Nazi Oppression, formerly the Association of Former Concentration Camp Inmates, Survivors of Nazi Oppression, was founded circa 1960 in Montreal. Many of its members were founding members of the Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre.
Accession No.
2014X.04.08
Name Access
Zablow, Lou
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Jews Being Sent to Be??ec or Majdanek

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76678
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : Pencil : Black, White ; Ht: 6,9 cm x W: 10 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : Pencil : Black, White ; Ht: 6,9 cm x W: 10 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 17, 1942-April 11, 1942
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
Polish
French
Notes
B&w photograph with a white border. An outdoor scene, in which a group of Jewish people standing in a line are being forced into a cattle car. At least five German officers are shown. In the background, there is a building with a sign that reads "FRISEUR." All those being deported have a Star of David on their backs. Narrative: After the invasion of Poland in 1939, Lublin was taken over by the Germans. During this German occupation, the city's population was a targeted, especially those that were Jewish inhabitants. It is known that the Nazis planned to turn Lublin into a new Germanized city by increasing its German population to approximately 25%. Lublin's Jewish population was forced into a ghetto. The majority of the 26,000 people living in the ghetto was deported to the Be??ec extermination camp between March 17, 1942 and April 11, 1942. The remainder were moved to Majdanek, a concentration camp located on the outskirts of the city.
Accession No.
2012.12.03
Name Access
Rubin, Faige
Places
Lublin, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Jews Being Sent to Be??ec or Majdanek

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76679
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : Ink : Black, White ; Ht: 6,9 cm x W: 9,9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : Ink : Black, White ; Ht: 6,9 cm x W: 9,9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 17, 1942-April 11, 1942
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
Polish
Notes
B&w photograph with a white border. An outdoor scene, in which a Jewish woman is being loaded into a cattle car, followed by her husband. A long line of people are waiting to make their way into the vehicle. There are two German officers taunting and poking a Jewish woman, while she is in line. A man in a trench coat is an onlooker. Narrative: After the invasion of Poland in 1939, Lublin was taken over by the Germans. During this German occupation, the city's population was a targeted, especially those that were Jewish inhabitants. It is known that the Nazis planned to turn Lublin into a new Germanized city by increasing its German population to approximately 25%. Lublin's Jewish population was forced into a ghetto. The majority of the 26,000 people living in the ghetto was deported to the Be??ec extermination camp between March 17, 1942 and April 11, 1942. The remainder were moved to Majdanek, a concentration camp located on the outskirts of the city.
Accession No.
2012.12.04
Name Access
Rubin, Faige
Places
Lublin, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Extrait du Journal officiel de la République française du 14 décembre 1926 - N Epuisé - Page I2993, 1ere colonne

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76680
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : paper ; Ht: 27,6 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : paper ; Ht: 27,6 cm x W: 21,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 01, 1951
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
French
Notes
Certificate attesting that Judka-Leib Beer and his three children are naturalized French citizens. The document is printed in black ink. A postage stamp is found on the bottom left of the document. The stamp says Taxes Communales, 10 Francs. Narrative: Judka-Leib Beer was born in 1877 in Warsaw. He was married to Liba Gudrot and had three children named Hélène, Arthur and Ezosza. He was the donor's grandfather.
Accession No.
2012.20.01
Name Access
Allen, Stéphane John
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Back to Top