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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : handwritten : Ink : beige ; Ht: 11,25 in. x W: 8,25 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : handwritten : Ink : beige ; Ht: 11,25 in. x W: 8,25 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 30, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
One page. Notes from a meeting regarding financial help to Jews in labour camps
Accession No.
2011X.35.2
Name Access
Levicky, Julius
Places
Humenne, Slovakia, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : handwritten : Ink : beige ; Ht: 11,75 in. x W: 8,25 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : handwritten : Ink : beige ; Ht: 11,75 in. x W: 8,25 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
October 20, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
1 page. Notes concerning expenses incurred by the Jewish community concerning school fees.
Accession No.
2011X.35.3
Name Access
Levicky, Julius
Places
Humenne, Slovakia, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : handwritten : ink : beige ; Ht: 11,75 in. x W: 8,25 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : handwritten : ink : beige ; Ht: 11,75 in. x W: 8,25 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 4, 1941
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
One page. Notes on community budget, probably for the minutes of a meeting; concerning Matza prices, contributions to synagogue
Accession No.
2011X.35.8
Name Access
Levicky, Julius
Places
Humenne, Slovakia, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note ? : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 12,2 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note ? : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 12,2 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 28, 1942
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
English
Notes
One page of lined paper. Handwritten in black ink about unobtainable Irish Visa for Sophie Philipson. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.013
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Grey, Black ; Ht: 7 6 in. x W: 3 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Grey, Black ; Ht: 7 6 in. x W: 3 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 4, 1940
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
French
Notes
1 small square page, single-sided. Document is handwritten in faded ink, with the names written in a different handwriting in two different inks. Signed in a third different ink. Document issued in St-Cyprien internment camp on September 4, 1940, states that the internee, Otto Bondy, is being escorted to Perpignan by Guard Bevan. Narrative: Otto Bondy was the father of the donor, Walter Absil. He was born in Vienna, Austria on January 1, 1897, and fled to Belgium with his family in 1938. In September 1940 he was interned with other German and Austrian Jews in St-Cyprien, but he escaped and returned to Brussels. He was deported from the Malines (Melechen) transit camp in Belgium to Auschwitz in September 1943, where he was murdered.
Accession No.
1990.96.07
Name Access
Absil, Walter
Places
St-Cyprien, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 19 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 19 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1939-1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Half page torn at bottom, two holes punched on right edge, creased down center and horizontally. Packing list for Herbert I. Isselbacher Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remaining prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.38
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 6 cm x W: 9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 6 cm x W: 9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Paper fragment with perforated edge and rounded corners, written in heavy pen with notes made afterwards in pencil. Dates of Birth of Isaac Isselbacher 1919/11/20, his mother Mathilde Lowenstein Isselbacher 1893/7/28, his father Jacob 1883/8/5, and brother Helmut 1921/12/20. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1042
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

The Last Stand: Jewish Resistance in Nazi Europe and the role of the Labor Zionist Movement

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn47541
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Booklet : printed, bound : grey-blue, brown, black, beige ; Ht: 21,1 cm x W: 13,8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Booklet : printed, bound : grey-blue, brown, black, beige ; Ht: 21,1 cm x W: 13,8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
43 pages. Softcover, paper bound with staples. Cover's edges are brown, and the centre is grey-blue (the brown is a result of discolouration, see condition); the title is printed in black. The back cover is the same colour as the front, with 1 line of text printed in the bottom centre. Interior pages are beige, consisting of text.
Accession No.
1997.39.15
Name Access
Flanders (Rome), Tibey
Places
New York, United States of America, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : paper : Ink : beige, black, blue ; Ht: 7,8 cm x W: 16,1 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : paper : Ink : beige, black, blue ; Ht: 7,8 cm x W: 16,1 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
November 28, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Polish
Notes
Note handwritten on memo paper, printed on left hand side; medical clinic.
Accession No.
2012.15.86
Name Access
Peltier, Cécile
Places
Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : paper : beige, blue, purple ; Ht: 13,3 cm x W: 21,1 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Note : paper : beige, blue, purple ; Ht: 13,3 cm x W: 21,1 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 25, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
One page. Handwritten letter to Chana (Anna) Zilberbogen (born Wartens) . On top left is an ink stamp of town hall of Bagnères-de-Luchon. On bottom is an oval postal ink stamp. Narrative: The Zilberbogen were a Jewish family originally from Warsaw (Poland). Mother Chana and daughters Elzbieta (born 1933) and Celinka (born 1937) moved to Belgium in 1939. The father, Szygmundt, an engineer, stayed in Poland. During the Second World War, the mother and daughters were first sent to Brens camp and then to Rivesaltes camp in the South of France before being released. Chana was then hospitalized and spent the war hidden in a Sanatorium in Mazamet from 1940 to 1947. Elzbieta and Celinka were hidden in various locations in the South of France, including a farm and different children's homes run by OSE. Szygmundt was killed in Poland. Chana and her daughters went back to live in Belgium after Liberation until immigrating to Canada in 1951.
Accession No.
2012.15.117
Name Access
Peltier, Cécile
Places
Luchon, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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