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10 records – page 1 of 1.

Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill : Paper : Ink : Beige, red ; Ht: 20,7 cm x W: 13 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill : Paper : Ink : Beige, red ; Ht: 20,7 cm x W: 13 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
January 22, 1941
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, single sided with the date in the upper right corner, and a circular stamp in the bottom left corner. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.057
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Galway, Ireland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Brief of the Canadian Jewish Congress to the Senate Special Committee on the Criminal Code (Hate Propaganda)

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn47542
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Report : typewritten, stapled : blue-green, black, beige ; Ht: 28 cm x W: 21,7 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Report : typewritten, stapled : blue-green, black, beige ; Ht: 28 cm x W: 21,7 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 22, 1968
Creator
-
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
22 pages. Bound using one staple at the top left corner. Blue-green cover with typewritten text. Pages are beige with black text: broken into chapters and articles.
Accession No.
2011X.293.03
Name Access
Schryver, Samuel
Places
Ottawa, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Bill of Sale

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59402
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill of Sale : Paper : Printed : Ink, graphite pencil : Pink, black, red. ; Ht: 17 cm x W: 11,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill of Sale : Paper : Printed : Ink, graphite pencil : Pink, black, red. ; Ht: 17 cm x W: 11,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 18, 1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Printed receipt grid with details filled in by hand, holes punched along left and bottom edge, stamped PAID. Bill for Mrs. Fanny Azeff Isselbacher’s wedding ring. Fanny Azeff married Mr. Isaac Herbert Isselbacher. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.90
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Bill-of-landing

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59428
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill-of-landing : Paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, black ; Ht: 21 cm x W: 15 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill-of-landing : Paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, black ; Ht: 21 cm x W: 15 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 28, 1942
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Page with two holes punched on top, vertical crease in center, entitled Extract Bill of Lading (misspelled on artifact). This is a bill from Mendelssohn Bros. Ltd., Montreal for Mr. Herbert Isselbaecher about the shipping of a trunk from SS “Moveria” to Ville Lasalle (total amount $3,50). Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.37
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Bill-of-sale

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59462
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill-of-sale : Paper : Printed : Ink, graphite pencil : Beige, grey, green. ; Ht: 7,5 cm x W: 15 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill-of-sale : Paper : Printed : Ink, graphite pencil : Beige, grey, green. ; Ht: 7,5 cm x W: 15 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 26, 1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Slip of paper with perforated edge on left and two holes punched on the top, Society Studio business details top left and No. 20300 on top right. Receipt for wedding photographs, cost of $15. Deposit made by Isaac Isselbaecher on the occasion of his marriage to Fanny Azeff. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.89
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Bill of Sale

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59465
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill of Sale : Paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, black, blue. ; Ht: 22 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Bill of Sale : Paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, black, blue. ; Ht: 22 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
January 19, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Page entitled Schwartz' Furniture Store, hole punched on top and left edge, grids printed for documenting transactions, details filled in by hand. Bill of Sale for Furniture bought by Isaac Isselbacher for a total of $13.72. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.93
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

A Brief Description of the Summer Palace of the Emperor Atwill

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60019
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Report : Paper : Ink : Black, White ; Ht: 33 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Report : Paper : Ink : Black, White ; Ht: 33 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Creator
Ellison, Bertram
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
3 pages, typed in paragraph form, and stapled in the top left corner. Narrative: Bertram Ellison (donor's uncle) was born on March 19 1909 in Montreal. He was born into a Jewish family, and was an insurance broker before the war. He joined the Canadian Army on June 5th 1941 as a 2nd Lieutenant. Between 1941 and 1945 he rose to the rank of major, and received 6 medals, including the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire which he received on December 18t 1945. He was part of the 21st Army Group, which was formed on July 9th 1943 by the 2nd British and 1st Canadian Army for a North Western European Invasion. While apart of the 21st Army Group, he saw Bergen-Belsen. Bertram Ellison sailed home on the RMS Queen Elisabeth on December 3rd – 9th 1945.
Accession No.
2013.01.35
Name Access
Berman, Marilyn
Places
Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Lou Zablow speaks at ceremony to honor authors of Anti-Hate Bill

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60146
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 7 7/8 in. x W: 9 3/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 7 7/8 in. x W: 9 3/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1967
Physical Condition
Excellent
Notes
b&w, Lou Zablow speaks at podium behind table, presentation ceremony to award plaque to authors of Anti-Hate Bill (James Walker, MP, Milton Klein, MP) Narrative: in 1964, Klein introduced Bill C-21 to House of Commons, seconded by Walker. This law never passed but was instrumental in the development of Anti-Hate legislation in Canada.Lou Zablow (1924-2005) was a Holocaust survivor from Lodz, Poland. He survived the Lodz ghetto, was deported to Auschwitz where he stayed four days before being sent to slave labour in Lieberose, Sachenhausen, and Mauthausen concentration camps. In April 1945, he was forced on a death march to Gunskirchen concentration camp where he was liberated by the US army. He immigrated to Montreal in 1949 and became the president of the Association of Survivors of Nazi Oppression (circa 1963-1971) and took part in the creation of the MHMC in 1979.
Accession No.
2011X.359.55
Name Access
Zablow, Lou
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Lou Zablow at ceremony to honor authors of Anti-Hate Bill

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60147
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 8 1/8 in. x W: 9 3/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 8 1/8 in. x W: 9 3/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1967
Physical Condition
Excellent
Notes
b&w, Lou Zablow (far right) behind table, presentation ceremony to award plaque to authors of Anti-Hate Bill (James Walker, MP, Milton Klein, MP) Narrative: in 1964, Klein introduced Bill C-21 to House of Commons, seconded by Walker. This law never passed but was instrumental in the development of Anti-Hate legislation in Canada.Lou Zablow (1924-2005) was a Holocaust survivor from Lodz, Poland. He survived the Lodz ghetto, was deported to Auschwitz where he stayed four days before being sent to slave labour in Lieberose, Sachenhausen, and Mauthausen concentration camps. In April 1945, he was forced on a death march to Gunskirchen concentration camp where he was liberated by the US army. He immigrated to Montreal in 1949 and became the president of the Association of Survivors of Nazi Oppression (circa 1963-1971) and took part in the creation of the MHMC in 1979.
Accession No.
2011X.359.56
Name Access
Zablow, Lou
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Lou Zablow at ceremony to honor authors of Anti-Hate Bill

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60148
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 8 1/8 in. x W: 9 3/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 8 1/8 in. x W: 9 3/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1967
Physical Condition
Excellent
Notes
b&w, Lou Zablow (2nd right) behind table, presentation ceremony to award plaque to authors of Anti-Hate Bill (James Walker, MP, Milton Klern, MP) Narrative: in 1964, Klein introduced Bill C-21 to House of Commons, seconded by Walker. This law never passed but was instrumental in the development of Anti-Hate legislation in Canada.Lou Zablow (1924-2005) was a Holocaust survivor from Lodz, Poland. He survived the Lodz ghetto, was deported to Auschwitz where he stayed four days before being sent to slave labour in Lieberose, Sachenhausen, and Mauthausen concentration camps. In April 1945, he was forced on a death march to Gunskirchen concentration camp where he was liberated by the US army. He immigrated to Montreal in 1949 and became the president of the Association of Survivors of Nazi Oppression (circa 1963-1971) and took part in the creation of the MHMC in 1979.
Accession No.
2011X.359.57
Name Access
Zablow, Lou
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.

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