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Portrait of six girls including Celinka (Cecile) Zilberbogen

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn48266
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : b&w ; Ht: 12,9 cm x W: 17,8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : paper : b&w ; Ht: 12,9 cm x W: 17,8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Later than 1945]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
White border, indoor scene. Six girls standing up while holding each other and a cat. Celinka (Cecile) Zilberbogen is the third one from the right wearing a peter pan collar dress and vest. In the background a massive wall with an ornamentation representing horses. Narrative: Photograph was taken at Andrésy OSE-run children's home. The “Œuvre de secours aux enfants” (OSE) is a Jewish organization designed to help children. OSE was established in 1912 in St. Petersburg (Russia) by doctors to help disadvantaged Jewish populations. It was then called the “Society for the health protection of the Jewish population”, in Russian Obshchetsvo Zdravookhraneniya Yevreyiev, abbreviated OZE. It rescued thousands of Jewish children during the Second World War. The Zilberbogen were a Jewish family originally from Warsaw (Poland). Mother Chana and daughters Elzbieta (born 1933) and Celinka (born 1937) moved to Belgium in 1939. The father, Szygmundt, an engineer, stayed in Poland. During the Second World War, the mother and daughters were first sent to a transit camp in the South of France before being released. Chana was then hospitalized and spent the war hidden in a Sanatorium in Mazamet. Elzbieta and Celinka were hidden in various locations in the South of France, including a farm and different children's homes run by OSE. Szygmundt was killed in Poland. Chana and her daughters went back to live in Belgium after Liberation until immigrating to Canada in 1951.
Accession No.
2012.15.42
Name Access
Peltier, Cécile
Places
Andresy, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
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