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Group in Front of Crematorium in former concentration Gross Rosen

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60156
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w ; Ht: 8.8 cm x W: 6 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w ; Ht: 8.8 cm x W: 6 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[ca. 1948]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Polish
Notes
Outside, seven people are shown in front of a crematorium at a former concentration camp: six adults, and one child. Five of the adults are sitting while one woman stands and looks towards the right. The child is off to one side and appears to be looking inside the crematorium. The background displays a thick row of trees behind a barbed-wire fence. In front of the fence stands a flagpole with the Polish flag. The people featured are Holocaust survivors who visited former concentration camps on the weekends, to hold postwar ceremonies in order to commemorate victims. Narrative: Donor is the son of Ely Rozenblat (born 1913-10-10 in Zamosc, Poland) and Zelda (maiden name Kozlowska, born 1915-09-09 in Lodz, Poland, grew up in Zamosc). The Rozenblat family was originally from Zamosc. They spoke Polish, Yiddish, German and Russian. While Zamosc was bombed in September 1939, the family hid in the grandparents’ basement. A German soldier found them and advised them to leave, warning them about SS troops coming to kill Jews. The family escaped to Russia and was sent to Samarkand, Uzbekistan. In 1941-1942, 9 members of the family died of starvation in Samarkand, including Ely’s first wife Hannah (who was Zelda’s sister) and Zelda’s first husband. In 1942-1943, the family was transferred to Siberia where they stayed until the end of the war. The surviving family members went back to Poland after the Liberation. Ely’s older sister was in a Displaced Persons’ Camp in Austria and moved to Montreal. The rest of the family immigrated to Israel between 1948 and 1954. Ely and Zelda stayed in Poland where they had a son, Henry (b. 1947) and a daughter born in 1949. Ely was a fervent Communist who believed in creating an idyllic communist life in Poland.ted to Israel between 1948 and 1954. Ely, Zelda and their children finally immigrated to Montreal, arriving on March 24, 1960. Ely found a job with friends from Poland, he worked as a butcher in a shop across from St. Michael’s church on St-Viateur Street in Montreal.
Accession No.
2013.16.01
Name Access
Rozenblat, Henry
Places
Gross Rosen, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
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