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Group portrait with Rosa Pliskin

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90220
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Printed : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 6 1/2 in. x W: 8 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Printed : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 6 1/2 in. x W: 8 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1938
Notes
White border. Formal group portrait, indoors. Nine people wearing black clothes, are sitting next to each other and looking at the camera. The older woman in the front row, on the right is Ester Klupt (née Cahnin). The third person from the right in second row is Rosa Pliskin-Sokolinski. The man in the middle is Mordechai Pliskin. Narrative: Rosa Pliskin-Sokolinski (nee Klupt) was born in Kovno, Lithuania in 1898. She married Mordechai Pliskin before the war. They had at least 4 children. The family owned a store in Kovno, circa 1925, which remained open until 1941. The family sold manufactured materials for clothing. In 1941 or 1942, Rosa’s grandmother Esther Klupt (née Chanin) was shot in front of the family store with her great-grandson. Esther was 91 years old. Rosa and her relatives were sent to the ghetto. Rosa was then deported to the Stutthof concentration Camp, Poland. She arrived at the camp on July 13,1944. During her internment, Rosa Pliskin kept her clothes and accessories on her body at all times. She concealed two combs, a needle, some thread and fabric patches in a fabric pouch tied around her neck. Rosa considered these items to be very precious, she said they were "like gold to her". Her identification prisoner number at Stutthof camp was 42451. Rosa Pliskin died in 1986 in Tivon, Israel. Rosa’s husband, Mordechai Pliskin died in Dachau. Four of their children, David, Seil (Saul), Klara and one unknown perished in the Holocaust. David Pliskin, was murdered in the Ninth Forst, a Nazi killing site 4 miles from Kovno.
Accession No.
1996.06.02
Name Access
Dworkind, Cyla
Places
Kaunas, Lithuania, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Grandmother Esther Chanin

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90221
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper; cardboard : Printed, glued : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 2 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper; cardboard : Printed, glued : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 2 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1920
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
Formal portrait glued onto black cardboard bearing the name of the portrait studio on the bottom. The image shows an older woman with dark hair wearing a large round pendant on a silver chain, another silver chain, earrings, and a black cape with tassels. The woman is Esther Klupt (née Chanin). Narrative: Esther Klupt (née Chanin) was Rosa Pliskin-Sokolinski's grandmother. Rosa Pliskin-Sokolinski (nee Klupt) was born in Kovno, Lithuania in 1898. She married Mordechai Pliskin before the war. They had at least 4 children. The family owned a store in Kovno, circa 1925, which remained open until 1941. The family sold manufactured materials for clothing. In 1941 or 1942, Rosa’s grandmother Esther Klupt (née Chanin) was shot in front of the family store with her great-grandson. Esther was 91 years old.
Accession No.
1996.03.01
Name Access
Dworkind, Cyla
Places
Lithuania, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Membership card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90222
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Membership card : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : Blue, black ; Ht: 11,9 cm x W: 15,7 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Membership card : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : Blue, black ; Ht: 11,9 cm x W: 15,7 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
May 27, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Czech
German
Notes
1 page, 1-sided. Printed with spaces filled out by hand along dotted lines. On b.l. is a rectangle with space for a photograph. Two pairs of staple marks remain but photo has been removed. This is Dezider Scheer's membership card to a Zionist organization in Prague. Narrative: Dezider Scheer was born April 26, 1918 in Mosovce, Slovakia to Nathan Scheer and Paulina Scheerova. In 1939, when Slovakia began to pass anti-Jewish laws, the Scheer family decided to immigrate illegally to Palestine, using a visa for Shanghai. Because of the cost and danger of the trip, it was decided that Dezider, then 20, would go first and then help bring his family over. He departed for Italy where a Greek boat was supposed to take him to Palestine, but the boat never came. Scheer and other Slovak refugees lived illegally in Italy for several months until they were arrested and placed in an Italian concentration camp, which Scheer described as very humane. The Dominican Republic Settlement Association (DORSA) came to the camp looking for young Jewish men to work on farms in the Dominican Republic. Scheer was selected and left for the Dominican Republic, via Spain, Portugal and the United States, in October 1940. About 700 Jewish refugees settled in Sosua, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic during this time, where they were given land and cows. Dezider Scheer remained in Sosua until 1950 before selling his farm and moving to Canada to join his brother Jan Siroky (Scheer). Dezider Scheer’s mother and four of his siblings survived the Holocaust; two sisters and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins were deported and killed.
Accession No.
1990.87.87
Name Access
Scheer, Dezider
Places
Prague, Czech Republic, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

The People on Canada's Conscience

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90223
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Pamphlet : Paper : Printed : Ink : Black, grey, white, blue ; Ht: 20,2 cm x W: 13,9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Pamphlet : Paper : Printed : Ink : Black, grey, white, blue ; Ht: 20,2 cm x W: 13,9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1943
Creator
Senator Cairine Wilson
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 sheet folded in half and printed on each side to make a 4-page pamphlet. The cover has the publisher's name on top, title and author in a rectangle of white. It is surrounded by two different tones of grey. On each side of the title rectangle there are 5 coats of arms representing the 9 provinces and Yukon (Newfoundland was not yet a province). The other three pages contain text that exhorts Canadians to write their M.P.s and demand that more refugees from the Nazis, including Jews, be welcomed to Canada. It emphasizes the abundance of space available in Canada and the important contributions of refugees that have already come. There is a card stapled to the cover that identifies CJC, United Jewish Refugee and War Relief Agencies as distributor of the pamphlet.
Accession No.
1997.39.12
Name Access
Flanders (Rome), Tibey
Places
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Token : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : beige, black, blue ; Ht: 11,4 cm x W: 7,9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Token : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : beige, black, blue ; Ht: 11,4 cm x W: 7,9 cm
Other Title Information
Exchange Medium
Date
June 24, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
I page, 2-sided. The front has a title followed by lines of text that contain printed prompts and hand-written answers. There are lines of vertical text on both the right and left borders, separated from the rest of the text by a motif that ressembles a diamond shape with lines coming out of it. The back has a table with some information filled out by hand. This is a ration card for clothing from France, 1944. It belonged to a Jewish girl, but because she was in hiding, she is not identified as Jewish and there is no "J" on the card. Narrative: This card belonged to the donor, Marguerite Elias. Her father, Maurice Elias, volunteered for the French Army on September 11, 1939 although he was not a French citizen. On March 20, 1940 he joined the 212 Infantry Division and was demobilized in 1941. He owned a store since 1933, which was assigned an administrator. He was taken on August 20, 1941 in the first round-up of Paris Jews (mostly professionals and intellectuals). He was picked up at 6:30 AM by 3 French men and taken to Drancy. Transferred to Compiegne because they thought that he was a Communist since he spoke Russian. On February 27, 1942 he was deported to Auschwitz and killed April 19, 1942. Afterwards, Marguerite and her sister left Paris and were taken care in hiding by Catholic farmers in the region of Grenoble, France. they stayed there between 1942 and 1944. After the liberation of Paris, the farmer who took care of the girls was accused of being a collaborator and the girls' mother came to get them.
Accession No.
2011X.53.02
Name Access
Elias, Marguerite
Places
Vatilieu, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90225
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, stamped, typed, handwritten : Ink : beige, black ; Ht: 7,6 cm x W: 12,7 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Printed, stamped, typed, handwritten : Ink : beige, black ; Ht: 7,6 cm x W: 12,7 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 23, 1948
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
French
Czech
Dutch
Polish
German
Russian
Hungarian
Italian
Hebrew
Ukrainian
Swedish
Notes
1 page, 2-sided. Front has printed lines with spaces filled out by stamp or typewriter on top half and a table with stamps on both sides on bottom half. The number 22 has been punched out on bottom right. On back is a table with 12 sections in 12 different languages. This is (Tobias) Aaron Rosengarten's immigration card as a child. The word son is written small in b.l. corner. Narrative: The donor (Tobias) Aaron Rosengarten was born in the Bergen Belsen DP camp on 9 September, 1946. His parents were Esther Rosengarten (nee Weirbska) and Eliasz Rosengarten of Pilica and Tarnow, Poland respectively. Esther was born the 15th of September 1914 and Eliasz was born March 1st 1909. They met in the Bergen Belsen DP camp after the war and were married 25 November, 1945. Both were holocaust survivors. Esther was in the Zawiercie ghetto, and then the Neusalz Concentration Camp, a Gross-Rosen subcamp, from September 1942 to January 1945. In January 1945 she survived a death march to Flossenburg before being transferred to Bergen Belsen. She was liberated from Bergen Belsen in April 1945. She and her brother, also in Bergen Belsen, were the sole survivors in their family. Eliasz Rosengarten was also in Bergen Belsen by the end of the war. He was the sole survivor in his family. The Rosengartens immigrated to Montreal in April 1948 and had another son in 1949. Once in Montreal Eliasz Rosengarten was treated for tuberculosis contracted in the camps. He died of a lung cancer related to this tuberculosis many years later in 1977.
Accession No.
1997.06.01
Name Access
Rosengarten, Aaron
Places
Halifax, Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Citizenship certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90226
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Citizenship certificate : Paper : Printed, typed : Ink : beige, green, gold, red, blue, black ; Ht: 19 cm x W: 28 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Citizenship certificate : Paper : Printed, typed : Ink : beige, green, gold, red, blue, black ; Ht: 19 cm x W: 28 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 11, 1975
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
French
Notes
1 page, 2-aided. On front elaborate green border frames two columns of text, an image of parliament at bottom and the Canadian coat of arms at t.c. The back is on a vertical axis with a simple black border around several lines of printed text, some of which are filled by typewriter. Narrative: The donor (Tobias) Aaron Rosengarten was born in the Bergen Belsen DP camp on 9 September, 1946. His parents were Esther Rosengarten (nee Weirbska) and Eliasz Rosengarten of Pilica and Tarnow, Poland respectively. Esther was born the 15th of September 1914 and Eliasz was born March 1st 1909. They met in the Bergen Belsen DP camp after the war and were married 25 November, 1945. Both were holocaust survivors. Esther was in the Zawiercie ghetto, and then the Neusalz Concentration Camp, a Gross-Rosen subcamp, from September 1942 to January 1945. In January 1945 she survived a death march to Flossenburg before being transferred to Bergen Belsen. She was liberated from Bergen Belsen in April 1945. She and her brother, also in Bergen Belsen, were the sole survivors in their family. Eliasz Rosengarten was also in Bergen Belsen by the end of the war. He was the sole survivor in his family. The Rosengartens immigrated to Montreal in April 1948 and had another son in 1949. Once in Montreal Eliasz Rosengarten was treated for tuberculosis contracted in the camps. He died of a lung cancer related to this tuberculosis many years later in 1977.
Accession No.
1997.06.02
Name Access
Rosengarten, Aaron
Places
Canada, North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Picnic in Korytnica

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90227
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Printed : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 3,5 in. x W: 5,25 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Printed : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 3,5 in. x W: 5,25 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
July 7, 1935
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Slovak
Notes
White ridged border. Group portrait showing a group of 9 young men in front of a train in wooded mountains. Two of the men are seated, the rest stand. Two women boarding the train are visible in the background. Narrative: Dezider Scheer was born April 26, 1918 in Mosovce, Slovakia to Nathan Scheer and Paulina Scheerova. In 1939, when Slovakia began to pass anti-Jewish laws, the Scheer family decided to immigrate illegally to Palestine, using a visa for Shanghai. Because of the cost and danger of the trip, it was decided that Dezider, then 20, would go first and then help bring his family over. He departed for Italy where a Greek boat was supposed to take him to Palestine, but the boat never came. Scheer and other Slovak refugees lived illegally in Italy for several months until they were arrested and placed in an Italian concentration camp, which Scheer described as very humane. The Dominican Republic Settlement Association (DORSA) came to the camp looking for young Jewish men to work on farms in the Dominican Republic. Scheer was selected and left for the Dominican Republic, via Spain, Portugal and the United States, in October 1940. About 700 Jewish refugees settled in Sosua, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic during this time, where they were given land and cows. Dezider Scheer remained in Sosua until 1950 before selling his farm and moving to Canada to join his brother Jan Siroky (Scheer). Dezider Scheer’s mother and four of his siblings survived the Holocaust; two sisters and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins were deported and killed.
Accession No.
1990.87.37
Name Access
Scheer, Dezider
Places
Korytnica, Slovakia, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Dezider Scheer on boat to Dominican Republic

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90228
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Digital file : b&w
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Digital file : b&w
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1940
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
Straight white border. Informal group portrait of a group of 6 men sitting on the ground or on a bench with coats and luggage. A group of women, whose heads are not visible, stand behind them. Dezider Scheer escaped to the Dominican Republic during the holocaust. Narrative: Dezider Scheer was born April 26, 1918 in Mosovce, Slovakia to Nathan Scheer and Paulina Scheerova. In 1939, when Slovakia began to pass anti-Jewish laws, the Scheer family decided to immigrate illegally to Palestine, using a visa for Shanghai. Because of the cost and danger of the trip, it was decided that Dezider, then 20, would go first and then help bring his family over. He departed for Italy where a Greek boat was supposed to take him to Palestine, but the boat never came. Scheer and other Slovak refugees lived illegally in Italy for several months until they were arrested and placed in an Italian concentration camp, which Scheer described as very humane. The Dominican Republic Settlement Association (DORSA) came to the camp looking for young Jewish men to work on farms in the Dominican Republic. Scheer was selected and left for the Dominican Republic, via Spain, Portugal and the United States, in October 1940. About 700 Jewish refugees settled in Sosua, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic during this time, where they were given land and cows. Dezider Scheer remained in Sosua until 1950 before selling his farm and moving to Canada to join his brother Jan Siroky (Scheer). Dezider Scheer’s mother and four of his siblings survived the Holocaust; two sisters and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins were deported and killed.
Accession No.
1990.87.39
Name Access
Scheer, Dezider
Places
North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Vacation in Slovakia

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn90229
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Printed : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 2,5 in. x W: 2,5 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Printed : Ink : b&w ; Ht: 2,5 in. x W: 2,5 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1934
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
Straight white border. Outdoors. Informal group portrait with five people seated on a bench (a sixth on the arm) and six people standing behind them. Dezider Scheer is seated third from left. Jan and Alexander Scheer are also in the photo. The other people are Gentile friends. Narrative: Dezider Scheer was born April 26, 1918 in Mosovce, Slovakia to Nathan Scheer and Paulina Scheerova. In 1939, when Slovakia began to pass anti-Jewish laws, the Scheer family decided to immigrate illegally to Palestine, using a visa for Shanghai. Because of the cost and danger of the trip, it was decided that Dezider, then 20, would go first and then help bring his family over. He departed for Italy where a Greek boat was supposed to take him to Palestine, but the boat never came. Scheer and other Slovak refugees lived illegally in Italy for several months until they were arrested and placed in an Italian concentration camp, which Scheer described as very humane. The Dominican Republic Settlement Association (DORSA) came to the camp looking for young Jewish men to work on farms in the Dominican Republic. Scheer was selected and left for the Dominican Republic, via Spain, Portugal and the United States, in October 1940. About 700 Jewish refugees settled in Sosua, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic during this time, where they were given land and cows. Dezider Scheer remained in Sosua until 1950 before selling his farm and moving to Canada to join his brother Jan Siroky (Scheer). Dezider Scheer’s mother and four of his siblings survived the Holocaust; two sisters and numerous aunts, uncles and cousins were deported and killed.
Accession No.
1990.87.24
Name Access
Scheer, Dezider
Places
Banska Bystrica, Slovakia, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.

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