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Application form

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn75151
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Application form : Paper : Printed, Typed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 10,5 in. x W: 8 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Application form : Paper : Printed, Typed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 10,5 in. x W: 8 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 7, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once vertically and twice horizontally. Square b&w photograph affixed to bottom right corner of recto. Document is an application to travel in the US for no more than 3 days (non-immigrant Visa), issued in Barcelona, Spain on March 7, 1944. The visa was issued to Jakob Baron, his wife Rejzla (Klarman) Baron, and their sons Maurice Aron Baron, and Albert Meyer Baron. They were to enter the United States at Philadelphia, Pa., around April 1, 1944, and cross the Canadian border around April 4, 1944. The family was to be under the care of the American Joint Distribution Committee during their time in the United States. No fee was prescribed for the visa. Transit certificate stamped on verso, left. Stamp on verso, right indicates that the family was admitted to the port in Philadelphia, Pa on April 2, 1944, for 2 days in transit to Montreal. Narrative: This visa was used to transport the donor Maurice Baron and his family into Montreal, where they settled. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 12, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. In 1943-01 the Barons crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944.
Accession No.
2002.13.06
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Barcelona, Spain, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
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Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76186
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Albert Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on 1944-03-20, and a test on 1944-05-02 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Albert Baron, born 1934, was the younger brother of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
Accession No.
2002.13.02
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76187
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Maurice Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on 1944-03-20, and a test on 1944-05-02 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
Accession No.
2002.13.03
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76188
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Jakob Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on March 3, 1944, and a test on May 2, 1944 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Jakob Baron was the father of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year.The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
Accession No.
2002.13.04
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn75171
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Rayala (Rayzele, Rose, Rosa) Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that she was vaccinated against smallpox on March 20, 1944, and a test on May 2, 1944 found her to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Rayala (Rayzele, Rose, Rosa) Baron, née Klarman, was the mother of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
Accession No.
2002.13.01
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Passport : Paper : printed, handwritten : Ink : beige, black, purple, blue, red ; Ht: 29,2 cm x W: 19,8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Passport : Paper : printed, handwritten : Ink : beige, black, purple, blue, red ; Ht: 29,2 cm x W: 19,8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
August 28, 1940
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
Polish
French
Portuguese
Notes
1 page. Two-sided passport document issued by Poland. On the recto, b.l., are two B&W identity pictures. On the left is Jacob Baron (b. 1902-03-2) and on the right is his wife, Rajzla Baron nee Klarman (b. 1903-06-01). On the verso are multiple stamps and, on the b.r., the indication that the couple was admitted at Philadephia on 1944-04-09. Narrative: The donor and his family fled from Nancy (France) to Toulouse (France) in 1940, where they were assigned forced residence status on 1941-02-02. The Vichy Statute of 1940-10-04 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On 1942-12-17 the Barons crossed the Pyrenees mountains on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona (Spain) for one year. They obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia on the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on 1944-03-23 and docked in Philadelphia on 1944-04-06. They arrived in Montreal by train on 1944-04-08. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been said that the ship transported about 7,800 refugees during the Second World War, among them hundreds of Jews.
Accession No.
2002.13.05
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Toulouse, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Permit : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Red, Grey ; Ht: 7 3/8 in. x W: 5 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Permit : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Red, Grey ; Ht: 7 3/8 in. x W: 5 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 12, 1941-May 07, 1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once horizontally and once vertically. Document is a receipt for the request of or renewal of an identity card for Rose Baron née Klarman, but in fact served as residence permit for her forced residence status. Square b&w photograph of subject is affixed at top left corner of form, which is numbered 7275 by hand in red ink. Above the photo, a handwritten annotation in red ink says that a decision was read on February 12, 1941, and under the photo, in the same handwriting, it is noted that Rose has been issued a forced residence (résidence assignée). Receipt was issued in Toulouse for residence in Bagnères-de-Luchon on February 21, 1942, and is valid, only within the same municipality, until September 7, 1942. On verso, stamps indicate that the permit was renewed twice: from May 7, 1942 to November 7, 1942, and November 7, 1942 to May 7, 1943. On verso, top, illegible handwriting in red ink relating to the chief of police and the date November 9, 1942. Annotations and addendums in red ink serve to transform this form from a document for requesting/renewing identity cards to a residence permit for controlling and surveilling stateless Jews in the Free Zone of Vichy France. Narrative: Rayala (Rayzele, Rose, Rosa) Baron, née Klarman, born 1903 in Warsaw, Poland, was the mother of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944.
Accession No.
2002.13.11
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Toulouse, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Police certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76191
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Police certificate : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 8 1/2 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Police certificate : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 8 1/2 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 9, 1943-June 20, 1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Spanish
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once vertically and 4 times horizontally. Missing vertical section on right side. Document states that Rosa Baron must present herself to the police every Sunday to ensure that she has not changed address. Document is numbered 317 and is written on the letterhead of the Barcelona Police Headquarters. Beneath letterhead, the words Concepcion Extranjeros refer to the fact that the Baron family are foreigners in Spain. It is dated June 9, 1943 and stamps at bottom of page indicate that she presented herself to the police the subsequent 2 Sundays (June 13 and 20, 1943). Her husband Jacob has a nearly identical form (2002.13.07). Narrative: Rayala (Rayzele, Rose, Rosa) Baron, née Klarman, born 1903 in Warsaw, Poland, was the mother of the donor, Maurice Baron. The family fled south to Toulouse in 1940, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944.
Accession No.
2002.13.14
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Barcelona, Spain, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Purple ; Ht: 2 in. x W: 9 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Purple ; Ht: 2 in. x W: 9 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 06, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
German
French
Italian
Notes
1 horizontal slip of paper, double-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a receipt for duty and identification coupon for Jakob Baron and family for United States customs at the port of Philadelphia, Pa. Receipt is numbered 317918 on right-hand side. The receipt names the Serpa Pinto as vessel, and is for 8 pieces of baggage. On verso, guidelines for passengers are printed in 4 languages. Narrative: This document was used by the donor, Maurice Baron, and his family during their immigration to Canada in 1944. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. In September 1943, the Barons crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been said that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
Accession No.
2002.13.13
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Philadelphia, United States of America , North America
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Green, Black, Purple, Blue ; Ht: 13 in. x W: 8,75 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Receipt : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Green, Black, Purple, Blue ; Ht: 13 in. x W: 8,75 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 22, 1944-March 23, 1944
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Portuguese
Notes
I page, single-sided. Folded 3 times horizontally and once vertically. Document is a receipt from the Lisbon Customs Office for boarded luggage. It lists 8 pieces of luggage (in Portuguese) which were loaded onto the Serpa Pinto under the name Baron. Document is dated March 22, 1944 and stamped Mar 23, 1944. Price of $50 printed at top right corner. Narrative: Jakob (Jacob) Baron, born 1902 in Wieruszów, Poland, was the father of the donor. The family fled Nancy to Toulouse in 1940, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been said that the ship transported about 7800 refugees during the Second World War, among them hundreds of Jews.
Accession No.
2002.13.12
Name Access
Baron, Maurice
Places
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

12 records – page 1 of 2.

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