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Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Box : carved, hinged : brown, brass ; Ht: 6,5 cm x W: 8,1 cm x De: 14,2 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Box : carved, hinged : brown, brass ; Ht: 6,5 cm x W: 8,1 cm x De: 14,2 cm
Other Title Information
Container
Physical Condition
Excellent
Notes
Wooden box with high-relief floral designs on each side and a filligree leaf design on the lid. Lid is attached to the base with 2 hinges. Narrative: The box was made by donor, David Kropveld, in woodworking class pre-war Amsterdam. David Kropveld was born in 1918 in Amsterdam. The university he was to attend was shut down by the Germans in 1940. In July 1940, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistence group in the south of France. As members of the White Brigade, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before being released. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz concentration camp (Poland). Father and son wore the badges of political prisoners and were selected for the slave labour camp of Monowitz, where they stayed for about five days prior to being transferred to camp of Treblinka (Poland). In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he had admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and Monowitz in December 1944 to compete boxing matches against other prisoners. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few iother prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved. No members of his family survived the war. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife. In 1947, the couple emigrated to Cuba, and in 1950, to Montreal where David began a successful career as a butcher. He immediately became involved in the underground in Holland, Belgium, and France. He was involved in transporting children to safe places. He participated in armed attacks of German convoys. He suffered two shootings and was arrested in France-subsequently sent to the camp of Breendock in Belgium and then to Treblinka, Sosnovitch, and Auschwitz. He was liberated by the Russian Amy.
Accession No.
1990.83.29
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59786
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black, brown, blue ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 20 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black, brown, blue ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 20 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 28, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Polish
Notes
Single-sided page, creased once horizontally and vertically, tears along creases repaired with tape, discolouration where tape fell off front. Certificate for David Kropveld confirming that he was a political prisoner and suffered from an injury in his shoulder. Likely from when he was almost shot in the heart. Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.10
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Szynwald, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59788
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black, grey ; Ht: 8,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black, grey ; Ht: 8,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 22, 1943
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Slip of paper creased vertically, form typed on front with handwritten details. Form indicates that David Kropveld was a Displaced Person from Holland, and had been captured/deported on 1943/4/22 as a Political Prisoner Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.4
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59789
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black, blue ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 20 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black, blue ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 20 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
July 21, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Dutch
Notes
Page creased horizontally and vertically, Dutch Militair Repatrieering Commissaris letterhead, stamped. Form grants permission for David Kropveld to travel to Amsterdam in July 1945. Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.5
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59795
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black, purple ; Ht: 21 cm x W: 13,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black, purple ; Ht: 21 cm x W: 13,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
July 15, 1947
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Dutch
Notes
Page with letter head of "Nationaal Werk En Politieke Gevangenen Van den Oorlog 1914-1918", double-sided, same form printed in German and French, two rows of x's across letterhead. Certificate of Assistance to Political Prisoners for David Kropveld. Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.17
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Brussels, Belgium, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59796
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 9 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 9 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 0, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Dutch
Notes
Slip of paper, creased horizontally across center, form on front with handwritten details. Written by the Dutch Repatriation Committee for Jand Propvela. Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.6
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Netherlands, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn50348
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : Beige, red, black, blue ; Ht: 14,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : Beige, red, black, blue ; Ht: 14,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
May 15, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Czech
Russian
Notes
Single-sided printed page with stamp and handwritten note on back, creased horizontally and vertically, repaired with tape. Polish Red Cross certificate for David Kropveld issued for identification. Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.2
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Gliwice, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Citizenship Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59791
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Citizenship Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black, blue ; Ht: 27 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Citizenship Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black, blue ; Ht: 27 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 29, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Dutch
Notes
Page creased horizontally and vertically, three stamps on front, tears repaired variety of tape types, fingerprint B.L. Temporary Certificate of Citizenship from Dutch Embassy for David Kropveld, issued on 29 June 1945 and expiring 29 October 1945. Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.8
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

David Kropveld

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn75139
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : b&w
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1940]
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
B&W portrait with white border. Portrait of David Kropveld as a boy, wearing a suit and tie. Narrative: Portrait of the donor, David Kropveld. David Kropveld was born on January 3, 1918 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. David took up boxing as a young man and participated in competitions. In July 1940, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France, passing as non-Jews. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before being released. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz concentration camp. Father and son wore the badges of political prisoners and were selected for the slave labour camp of Monowitz, where they stayed for about five days prior to being transferred to Treblinka. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he had admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and Monowitz in December 1944 to compete boxing matches against other prisoners. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few iother prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved. No members of his family survived the war. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife. In 1947, the couple emigrated to Cuba, and in 1950, to Montreal where David began a successful career as a butcher.
Accession No.
2011X.23.01
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Identification card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn50267
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Black, White, Red ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 3 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Identification card : Paper : Black, White, Red ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 3 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
August 27, 1941
Physical Condition
Good
Language
Dutch
Notes
Two sided, with two vertical folds. The front has a photograph of David Kropveld, as well as three stamps, one is a circular stamp with the Coat of arms of the republic of the United Netherlands in the middle. The back has two finger prints, as well as one circular stamp with the Coat of Arms of the Republic of the United Netherlands in the middle. Narrative: Identification Card used by David Kropveld while in Holland. David Kropveld was born on January 3, 1918, in Amsterdam, Holland. In July 1940, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistence group in the south of France. As members of the White Brigade, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before being released. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz concentration camp (Poland). Father and son wore the badges of political prisoners and were selected for the slave labour camp of Monowitz, where they stayed for about five days prior to being transferred to camp of Treblinka (Poland). In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he had admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and Monowitz in December 1944 to compete boxing matches against other prisoners. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved. No members of his family survived the war.
Accession No.
1990.83.9
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Amsterdam, Netherlands, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

25 records – page 1 of 3.

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