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52 records – page 1 of 6.

Brinberg, Georgette - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60315
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:32:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:32:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
English; French
Notes
Georgette Brinberg (née Tepicht) was born on June 10, 1938 in the mining town of Villerupt in northern France. In the 1940s, when the town was attacked by Germany, her mother, father and older sister fled to Paris. Although she was young, she remembers that her father in 1940 was rounded-up and sent to a working camp, and eventually to Auschwitz. In July 1942, she, her sister and mother were rounded up and sent off to the Vélodrome d’Hiver where she stayed for a week until she was split up from her mother and destined to be sent to Auschwitz. Fortunately, Georgette and her sister were able to flee the Vel d’Hiv and were sent to Morée. She does not remember how she ended up there, but she does know that she was in hiding with her sister, and that there was a constant fear of being captured. She had to learn all the Catholic rites in order to pass off as a Catholic girl. In 1944, about the time of the liberation of France, she once more fled Morée and returned to Paris after jumping onto an American truck. Once she arrived in Paris with her sister, they sought out their grandmother who was still in hiding. All three stayed in hiding until the end of the war, and eventually moved to Israel in 1948. In Israel, she joined the Kibbutz – a collective community traditionally based on agriculture. She stayed there, learning Yiddish, until the 1950s. She eventually decided to move to Canada where her sister lived with her husband. In 1955, she finally arrived in Montreal where she went to business school and worked in the Quebec Order of Chartered Accountants. She married in 1957 and had three kids. In subsequent years, she researched the whereabouts of her family and tried to find a trace of those that helped her. She even returned to Paris to learn more about her past and her family legacy. She feels that her story should be told for future generations to remember, in her words: “if I can tell my grandchildren, then why not everyone [else]?”
Accession No.
WTH-462
Name Access
Brinberg, Georgette
Places
Villerupt, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Calderon, Leon - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60302
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
02:02:03
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
02:02:03
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
English
Notes
Leon Calderon was born in 1926 in Salonika, Greece, to a family of Yugoslavian origins. He had four siblings who, along with his parents, perished in Auschwitz in 1943, except for one brother who died in the Warsaw ghetto. After the war broke out in Greece, he lived in Salonika in the ghetto until April 1943, when he was deported to Auschwitz-Birkenau. He was there for about six months. In October 1943, he was transferred to the Warsaw ghetto, where he had to clean up and collect bricks after the uprising. In June 1944 the Russians were approaching, and after a five-day death march, he was transferred by train to Dachau, where he remained for a week. Then he was transferred to the Mildorf labor camp in Germany, where he worked on the construction of a tunnel until April 1945. With the American Army approaching, they were put on a train, which was also bombed, and were finally liberated on April 30, 1945 by the Americans. Leon stayed for a week in a DP camp near Munich, then for a month in the Landsberg DP camp. He returned to Salonika until the Greek civil war began in 1949. He moved to Israel, returning to Salonika in 1953 to obtain visas for Canada. In August 1955, he came to Canada by boat. He got married and he had two daughters. He worked as a salesman and manager of a store, and owned his own company until 1975.
Accession No.
WTH-161
Name Access
Calderon, Leon
Places
Salonika, Greece, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Cieply, Isak - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn67767
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
02:26:32
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 video     1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
02:26:32
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
English
Notes
Isak Cieply was born on February 1, 1924 in Starachowice, Poland. He had five siblings and the family was very poor. In the fall of 1939, soon after the German invasion, the Jews of Starachowice were ordered to move into the ghetto. Isak was selected to work in a steel factory and his work pass protected him from round-ups. At the beginning of 1943 he was sent to the Bugaj camp to work in a supplies warehouse. In the summer of 1944 the camp was liquidated after rumours of the approach of the Soviet army had spread. The prisoners were taken to Auschwitz. Isak was sent to work in an electric supplies warehouse in Buna/Auschwitz III. There he met a German soldier who proposed a deal that Isak accepted. Isak was to supply this soldier with electric materials and, in return, he would get a loaf of bread every day. In January 1945 Isak was sent on a death march to the Flossenbürg concentration camp. Sometime later he was sent on another death march but succeeded to escape with some fellow prisoners. They eventually met American soldiers. After liberation Isak worked as the chief supplier of the Pfarrkirchen and Eggenfelden DP camps. He immigrated to Canada in 1948 and married the late Regina Cieply who was also a survivor. They had four children and several grandchildren, among them Jamie Benizri.
Accession No.
WTH-213
Name Access
Cieply, Isak
Places
Wierzbnik Starachowice, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Video Tracks
Images
Less detail

Cohen, Matla - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60312
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:28:09
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:28:09
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
English
Notes
Matla Cohen was born November 15th, 1934 in Mezrich, Poland. She comes from a family of six that include two sisters and one twin brother. The pre-war period is somewhat unfamiliar to her due to her very young age, but her first real awareness of the war was when she and her family had to hide out in the garden after areas around her home were bombarded. In 1939-40, she and her family had been relocated to Vitebsk, Belarus. Her parents worked in a factory and she was in a nursery with her brother. Once more, they were forcefully relocated to a labour camp in Siberia. Her parents worked early and returned at night, while Matla was placed in a barrack and became caretaker of her siblings. She recalls her time there as being: “very difficult”. Ultimately, her family escaped the barrack as her father bribed a commandant with the prospect of a tailored suit. They finally got to an area in the Caucasus Mountains where they lived until the war ended. After the war, they returned back to Poland. They lived there for a month where the Madrichim approached their parents in hopes of sending Anne to Israel. She was separated from her family and sent to a DP camp in Berlin, awaiting the transport to Israel. In the end, that never took place as she jumped from camp to camp until a French Canadian woman in one of them suggested that she move to Montreal; a suggestion she followed in 1948. In Canada, she was adopted by a local family in Ste. Agathe and lived there until she attended college at the age of 18 in Montreal. She would visit her family in Ste. Agathe most weekends, and that is where she met her first husband; a marriage which lasted ten years. A few years later she met her second husband, Benjamin, to whom she is still married. She has five children.
Accession No.
WTH-448
Name Access
Cohen, Matla
Places
Mezrich, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Dawang, Elie - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60321
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
03:55:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 video     1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
03:55:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
French
Notes
Elie Dawang was born on January 4, 1934 in Paris, France, to Lithuanian parents. Elie has good memories of his early childhood, being raised by loving and well-off parents. In May 1940, the Dawangs left Paris for a small village near the Spanish border. Despite the great danger, they went back to Paris to liquidate the business of Feivish, Elie’s father. The three of them were arrested in September 1941 and while Feivish managed to get Elie out of prison, he couldn’t do anything to save himself or his wife. They were both sentenced and sent to jail for possessing false papers. They both ended up in Auschwitz, but Elie’s mother was gassed upon arrival whereas Feivish survived the war. Meanwhile, Elie was being taken care of by a Jewish woman. Elie and his caretaker almost got arrested during the roundup of Vel d’Hiv but managed to hide. After a few months hiding in the suburbs of Paris, they moved to the country where they stayed until liberation. When Paris was liberated, they moved back there and Elie returned to school. He reunited with his father in May 1945. They moved to Canada in 1951 with Elie’s stepmother. Elie describes the process to immigrate, his first impressions of Montreal and Canada and his involvement in Holocaust education.
Accession No.
WTH-482
Name Access
Dawang, Elie
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Video Tracks
Images
Less detail

Dawidovicz, David - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60325
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
02:48:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
02:48:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
French
Notes
David Dawidovicz was born on July 17, 1924 in Lodz, Poland. Soon after, his family moved to Tel-Aviv, Israel, where they stayed until 1931. At that point, they moved to Paris because of endemic poverty in Tel-Aviv. After four years in France, David, his mother and two of his sisters were expelled from France because they were illegal immigrants, unlike David’s father. David remembers the train journey through Germany, seeing lots of swastikas on buildings and on uniforms. He and his relatives spent six months in Lodz. There, David realized that Jews in Poland weren’t as emancipated as Jews in France. Back to France, David attended school until the war began. In 1941 and 1942, he witnessed several roundups. During the Vel d’Hiv roundup of July 1942, he hid in a small apartment with other people. They were able to hide thanks to French policemen who used to warn Jews. David hid for several weeks. He was eventually arrested in August 1942 by French policemen who took him to the offices of the UJF (Union des Juifs français). This organization gave money to the French police to send Jews to work in the Ardennes (a French region) instead of deporting them to Poland. David worked there until January 1944, at which point he decided to escape and join the resistance. He partook in the liberation of Paris. After the war, David took part in a program to de-Nazify the German youth. He lives in Paris to this day.
Accession No.
WTH-534
Name Access
Dawidovicz, David
Places
Lodz, Poland, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Dlusy, Jon - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60314
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:50:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:50:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
English
Notes
Jon Dlusy was born Yonah Dlusniewski on October 29, 1927 in Berlin, Germany, to Polish parents. They had moved to Germany in 1919, living in the Charlottenburg area of Berlin. There, his father had established a clothing manufacturing business. Jon had an older brother who later worked for the Canadian Air Force and got killed in Scotland in 1944 returning from an operation. In May 1938, Jon’s father decided to leave Germany because of the increasing antisemitism. They obtained visas for Belgium and fled Germany, leaving everything behind. They stayed in Antwerp for about four months, waiting for the Canadian visas. Once they received them, they immigrated to Montreal via Liverpool and Halifax. They already had family in Canada. They lived in Outremont. Jon is now retired. His mother lived until 101 years old.
Accession No.
WTH-455
Name Access
Dlusy, Jon
Places
Berlin, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Eliasewitz, Fruma - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60313
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:56:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
01:56:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
English
Notes
Fruma Eliasewitz was born on January 1, 1922 in Skaudvile, Lithuania, to a religious family. She had five sisters and one brother. At the age of 15, she moved to Klaipeda (Memel) to work in a cigarette factory for two years. She got married in 1939. When the German army invaded Lithuania in 1939, Fruma moved to Tuarage and then to Kuanas where she remained until June 1941, working again in a cigarette factory. She spent a year and a half in the Slobodka ghetto. In 1942, she was transferred to Riga, Latvia, where she worked in the airport to supply building material. With the Russians approaching, she was deported to Dachau where she worked in the kitchen until April 1945. She was forced on a death march for almost a week until she was liberated by the American army in April 1945 near Wolfratshausen, Germany. She spent a short period in the Feldafing DP camp in Germany. Between 1945 and 1949 she lived with her husband in Munich, working in the kitchen for the Jewish committee and raising their first son. In 1949, the family moved to Israel where she had her second son. The following year, she had a daughter. In March 1953 she immigrated to Canada via Paris and Halifax. She worked various jobs - washing floors, in a stocking factory, and Cantor’s bakery in Côte St Luc. Two of her sisters live in Israel and four in Montreal.
Accession No.
WTH-453
Name Access
Eliasewitz, Fruma
Places
Skaudvile, Lithuania, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Engelhard, Sarah - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60316
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
04:49:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
04:49:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
English
Notes
Sarah Engelhard was born on July 10, 1932 in Alsace-Lorraine, France. Her childhood was spent in Toulouse, where she lived with her parents and her younger brother Jack. With an increasing number of Jews in Toulouse being taken by the Nazis, her family escaped to Spain when she around nine years old. To do so they obtained false papers and hired guides to take them over the Pyrenees. They lived in Spain for almost two years, finally immigrating to Canada on the first day of Passover in April 1944. Though she picked up English quickly, she didn’t enjoy her first years in Canada. High school was hard for her, and she dropped out at age 15 to help her father sell his handbags. Though she managed to do her part well, he did not, and the business fell through. She found a job in the music section at Eaton’s department store. When she was 18 she left home and became engaged to a man she had known in high school, Avi Boxer. That engagement fell through and, after obtaining her degree from St. George’s University, she married a man twenty years her senior named Harry. They had three children. She moved with Harry to Philadelphia where he was working as an engineer. There, she began to write French love songs and perform in dinner clubs as a singer as well as audition for plays. She also taught French, eventually getting a television program for teaching French. She and Harry divorced in 1972. A year or two later she returned to Montreal after having visited Europe for the first time since she left. She reunited with Avi, and though the relationship was sour they had a child, Asa. In 1993 she and Asa left for Israel, where she lived for nine years. She returned to Montreal in 2002 and has since written a book about her life.
Accession No.
WTH-470
Name Access
Engelhard, Sarah
Places
Saarbrucken, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Engelhard, Sarah - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60326
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
04:49:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
04:49:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
French
Notes
Sarah Engelhard was born on July 10, 1932 in Alsace-Lorraine, France. Her childhood was spent in Toulouse, where she lived with her parents and her younger brother Jack. With an increasing number of Jews in Toulouse being taken by the Nazis, her family escaped to Spain when she around nine years old. To do so they obtained false papers and hired guides to take them over the Pyrenees. They lived in Spain for almost two years, finally immigrating to Canada on the first day of Passover in April 1944. Though she picked up English quickly, she didn’t enjoy her first years in Canada. High school was hard for her, and she dropped out at age 15 to help her father sell his handbags. Though she managed to do her part well, he did not, and the business fell through. She found a job in the music section at Eaton’s department store. When she was 18 she left home and became engaged to a man she had known in high school, Avi Boxer. That engagement fell through and, after obtaining her degree from St. George’s University, she married a man twenty years her senior named Harry. They had three children. She moved with Harry to Philadelphia where he was working as an engineer. There, she began to write French love songs and perform in dinner clubs as a singer as well as audition for plays. She also taught French, eventually getting a television program for teaching French. She and Harry divorced in 1972. A year or two later she returned to Montreal after having visited Europe for the first time since she left. She reunited with Avi, and though the relationship was sour they had a child, Asa. In 1993 she and Asa left for Israel, where she lived for nine years. She returned to Montreal in 2002 and has since written a book about her life.
Accession No.
WTH-537
Name Access
Engelhard, Sarah
Places
Saarbrucken, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

52 records – page 1 of 6.

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