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CAPLAN, Miss Nettie

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/genealogy57293
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
File Date
1924-1926
Record Source
JIAS Montreal Immigrant Case Files 1922-1951
Fonds No.
I0037
Series No.
CA
File No.
29-7936
Restrictions
Due to privacy laws, access to further information about this record is restricted. You may contact CJCCCNA to learn more.
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Repository
Canadian Jewish Archives
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, Yellow, Beige ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 9,3 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, Yellow, Beige ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 9,3 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Hebrew
Notes
1 page. The right hand side shows the tablets of the law written in Hebrew with the Star of David on top. Left hand side is a message of congratulations. Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old . The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach . While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.03
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink; Pencil : Blue, Red, Black, Beige ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 12 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink; Pencil : Blue, Red, Black, Beige ; Ht: 5 in. x W: 12 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Notes
1 page. On the right hand side there is the Star of David above a Torah scroll with a pointer and a prayer book.Left side contains message of congratulations. Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old . The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach . While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.08
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Pencil; Ink : Yellow, Black, Blue, Red, White ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 7,5 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Pencil; Ink : Yellow, Black, Blue, Red, White ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 7,5 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Notes
1 page. Right hand side shows a drawing of young boy wearing shirt, sweater and tie with his hand extended and a text bubble coming from his mouth reading "congratulations" Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old . The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach . While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.07
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

DRESKIN, Nechia /Nettie

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/genealogy92988
Collection
Saint John Jewish Historical Museum Synagogue Records
Material Format
textual record
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
  1 image  
Collection
Saint John Jewish Historical Museum Synagogue Records
Material Format
textual record
Name of Father
JOSEPH ISAAC
Date of Birth
1886
Date of Death
June 14, 1913
Place Where Deceased
New Brunswick, Canada
Cemetery
Shaarei Zedek Cemetery
Age at Time of Death
26 years
Notes
Gravestone reference code(s): JM 998.61.110. Memorial plaque in synagogue: Nathan and Mary Meltzer - E5 . Additional notes: died in childbirth
Record Source
SJJHM Cemetery and Obituary Records
Fonds No.
SJJHM-S
File No.
225
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Repository
Saint John Jewish Historical Museum
Images
Less detail

FRUCHTER, Meyer / SHAPIRO, Hersh, Nettie, Jennie

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/genealogy71943
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
File Date
1947-1948
Notes
This file concerns two or more families.
Record Source
JIAS Montreal Immigrant Case Files 1922-1951
Fonds No.
I0037
Series No.
CA
File No.
96-23548
Restrictions
Due to privacy laws, access to further information about this record is restricted. You may contact CJCCCNA to learn more.
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Repository
Canadian Jewish Archives
Less detail

Greeting card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn78326
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Greeting card : Paper : Ink; Graphite pencil ? : beige, grey, black ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 24,8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Greeting card : Paper : Ink; Graphite pencil ? : beige, grey, black ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 24,8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Notes
1 page, 2 sided. Paper is folded down the middle to make a card. Front right side has handwritten text framed by a pattern drawn in pencil. Back is mostly empty with a name written on the bottom right. Document is a handmade congratulation card for a Bar mitzvah celebrated in Wurzach internment camp. Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old. The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach. While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.06
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Greeting card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn78327
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Greeting card : Paper : Ink; Graphite Pencil? : Beige, grey, black ; Ht: 11,5 cm x W: 25,2 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Greeting card : Paper : Ink; Graphite Pencil? : Beige, grey, black ; Ht: 11,5 cm x W: 25,2 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 24, 1945
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
Dutch
Notes
1 page, 2 sided. Paper is folded down the middle to make a card. Front right side has handwritten text framed by a pattern drawn in pencil. Back is mostly empty with a name written on the bottom right. Document is a handmade congratulation card for a Bar mitzvah celebrated in Wurzach internment camp. Narrative: Donor's grandfather was born in Britain in 1895. He moved to Holland when he was six years old. The family therefore qualified for British citizenship. Donor's father applied for British identification papers. Donor Nettie and her brother Joseph went briefly into hiding but their mother wanted the family together so they returned to Amsterdam. The family was rounded up on March 17th 1943, and taken to the Stadsschouwburg (a big cinema with seats removed) in Amsterdam where they stayed for about a week. From there they were sent to the camp of Westerbork, where they stayed for a couple of months. In the summer time they were sent to another camp in Amersfoort for about 4-6 weeks. They were afterwards sent back to Westerbork and at the beginning of 1944, the entire family was sent to Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany. In Bergen-Belsen, the men and women were separated; the children from the age of 14 were sent to work. Nettie was considered small in stature, she lied about her age so she didn’t have to go to work. Her sister was three years older and was sent to work in the kitchen. Their father worked in a shoe factory and their mother worked in the kitchen peeling potatoes. Joseph (Nettie's younger brother) stayed in the camp with her. The family stayed in Bergen-Belsen until the end of 1944 (circa October or December) when they were sent to Wurzach with about. While on the train to Wurzach, the family had a separate carriage and they were told to take off the yellow stars because they were now considered internees. Additional research shows that in the winter 1944/1945 the castle of Bad Wurzach (160 km south of Stuttgart) served as a stopover for 72 Jewish prisoners from the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. They were Jews from Holland, who were foreign nationals, meaning they had either the British or U.S. citizenship or at least papers from South and Central American countries, and were regarded as "exchangeable" over German nationals in Allied custody. They had been sent in two shipments in the fall and winter from concentration camps in Germany, in order to be exchanged in Switzerland against German citizens held by the Allies. They were sent to different internment camps of Württemberg: Liebenau, Biberach and Wurzach. According to internees from Jersey already living in Bad Wurzach, the so-called "exchange Jews" were in a terrible state when they arrived; they were starved and scared. Through improved nutrition and the additional Red Cross parcels, they recovered relatively quickly. Only one of them perished in Wurzach . While in Wurzach, Joseph celebrated his bar mitzvah on February 24th, 1945; many internees including non-Jewish internees were present. Coffee and cakes were served; thanks to a monthly parcel from POWs (milk, sugar, cocoa) which had been saved to be used for the occasion. Joseph received bar mitzvah cards made by attendees. The family stayed in Wurzach until the end of April when the camp was liberated.
Accession No.
1990.13.05
Name Access
Herscher, Nettie
Places
Bad Wurzach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

GROSSMAN, Nettie

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/genealogy58906
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Collection
JEWISH IMMIGRANT AID SERVICES (JIAS)
Material Format
textual record
File Date
1925-1927
Record Source
JIAS Montreal Immigrant Case Files 1922-1951
Fonds No.
I0037
Series No.
CA
File No.
38-9620
Restrictions
Due to privacy laws, access to further information about this record is restricted. You may contact CJCCCNA to learn more.
Archival / Genealogical
Genealogy Records
Repository
Canadian Jewish Archives
Less detail

HARRIS, Nettie

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn62875
Collection
Canadian Jewish Congress organizational records
Description Level
File
Material Format
textual record
Fonds No.
CJC0001; ZB (General Documentation: Personalia)
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Canadian Jewish Congress organizational records
Description Level
File
Material Format
textual record
Date
1986
Fonds No.
CJC0001
Series No.
ZB (General Documentation: Personalia)
Notes
Article 'Confessions of an Extra'. File characteristics: Clippings. Montreal-related material.
Name Access
HARRIS, Nettie
Subjects
Nettie HARRIS
Places
Montreal
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Canadian Jewish Archives
Less detail

15 records – page 1 of 2.

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