Skip header and navigation

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59457
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 23, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Page with two holes punched on left edge, vertical crease in center, Nazi ink stamp left center. This is a certificate from the Mayor of Isselbach to Herbert Israel Isselbacher. It certifies that Mr. Isselbacher does not have any properties in town. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.77
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59461
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 09, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Page with multiple holes punched on left edge, Nazi ink stamp, entitled "Bescheinigung" (certificate). Certificate to Herbert Isselbaecher. It says that he doesn’t have to pay anything to the community of Isselbach. This document was necessary to get permission to leave the country in 1939. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.87
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn50168
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Black, Yellow, Purple ; Ht: 8 1/4 in. x W: 11 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Black, Yellow, Purple ; Ht: 8 1/4 in. x W: 11 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
March 13, 1939
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
German
Notes
1 page, printed back and front. 10 colums. Stamp in the bottom right corner with the Reichsadler in the center. Document cancels the registration with police authorities prior to immigration. Narrative: Issued in Isselbach indicated that Herbert Isselbaecher moved from Iselbach to Frankfurt am Main on 13 March 1939. This document notified police authority of the intention to move. Soon after this on July 29th, 1939, Herbert left Germany, and entered England with a trainee permit. He registered with the Jewish Refuge committee, and the tribunal decided he was a refugee from Nazi oppression. On July 13th 1940, Herbert entered Canada, and was places in Camp N, in Sherbrooke, Quebec.
Accession No.
1999.01.82
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

Employment certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn50320
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Employment certificate : Paper : Ink : Purple, Black, Biege ; Ht: 5 3/4 in. x W: 8 1/4 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Employment certificate : Paper : Ink : Purple, Black, Biege ; Ht: 5 3/4 in. x W: 8 1/4 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 29, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
1 page, one-sided. Circular ink stamp in the bottom left corner, with a Reichsadler in the middle of it. Certificate for Isack Herbert Isselbächer, finding him to be hard working. Narrative: Herbert left Germany at the end of July 1939 and entered England with a trainee permit. He registered with the Jewish Refuge committee and a tribunal ruled that he was a refugee from Nazi oppression.However, he was interned as an enemy alien in England, because of his German nationality. On July 13, 1940, Herbert entered Canada and was placed in Camp N, in Sherbrooke, Quebec.
Accession No.
1999.01.86
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Envelope : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Blue, black, grey ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 16 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Envelope : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Blue, black, grey ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 16 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
August 14, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
German
Notes
Envelope cut open on top edge, Deutsche Reich stamp value of 25 reichs pfennig, decorative crosshatching printed on exterior and interior, German postage stamp T.R., return town written on back without name. Used for a letter to Mr. Joseph Rosenthal, the Landlord of Isaac Herbert Isselbacher in London. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05, to Yitzkhak and Lina. Their mother was Mathilde Loewenstein Isselbacher, born 1893/7/28 to Feist and Rosa. Isaac and Herbert had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and he started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, it was discovered that their parents had been killed in Auschwitz, so the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbors at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
2011X.167.06
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 30 cm x W: 20 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black. ; Ht: 30 cm x W: 20 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
August 13, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Page creased horizontally and vertically, two holes punched on the left. Personal letter to Isaac Herbert Isselbacher from his mother. She had stayed in Isselbach, Germany. This letter was received in the last year he heard from his parents. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05, to Yitzkhak and Lina. Their mother was Mathilde Loewenstein Isselbacher, born 1893/7/28 to Feist and Rosa. Isaac and Herbert had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and he started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, it was discovered that their parents had been killed in Auschwitz, so the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbors at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
2011X.167.01
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 29 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 29 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 13, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Page creased horizontally and vertically, two holes punched on left. Personal letter to Isaac Isselbacher from his mother. She had remained in Isselbach, Germany. He was working in England at the time. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05, to Yitzkhak and Lina. Their mother was Mathilde Loewenstein Isselbacher, born 1893/7/28 to Feist and Rosa. Isaac and Herbert had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and he started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, it was discovered that their parents had been killed in Auschwitz, so the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbors at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
2011X.167.02
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 20 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 20 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
November 27, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Half page, creased horizontally and vertically, minor brown stains, two holes punched on left. Personal letter to Isaac and Helmut Isselbacher from their father who stayed in Isselbach, Germany. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05, to Yitzkhak and Lina. Their mother was Mathilde Loewenstein Isselbacher, born 1893/7/28 to Feist and Rosa. Isaac and Herbert had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and he started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, it was discovered that their parents had been killed in Auschwitz, so the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbors at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
2011X.167.03
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 29 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 29 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 15, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Creased horizontally and vertically, two holes punched on left. Letter to Isaac and Helmut Isselbacher from several relatives including Edith, Aunt Frieda, Aunt Selma, and Sally living in Isselbach, Germany. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05, to Yitzkhak and Lina. Their mother was Mathilde Loewenstein Isselbacher, born 1893/7/28 to Feist and Rosa. Isaac and Herbert had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and he started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, it was discovered that their parents had been killed in Auschwitz, so the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbors at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
2011X.167.04
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany , Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 30 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Letter : Paper : Handwritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 30 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
August 20, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
German
Notes
Page creased horizontally and vertically, two holes punched on left edge. Letter to Isaac Isselbacher in London from his mother in Isselbach, Germany. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05, to Yitzkhak and Lina. Their mother was Mathilde Loewenstein Isselbacher, born 1893/7/28 to Feist and Rosa. Isaac and Herbert had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and he started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Isaac travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, it was discovered that their parents had been killed in Auschwitz, so the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbors at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
2011X.167.05
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
Isselbach, Germany, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.

Back to Top