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49 records – page 1 of 5.

The Authorised Daily Prayer Book of the United Hebrew Congregations of the British Empire

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn47756
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
book
Physical Description
Book : printed, bound, gilded, dyed : grey, gold, pink, beige ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 10,8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
book
Physical Description
Book : printed, bound, gilded, dyed : grey, gold, pink, beige ; Ht: 16,5 cm x W: 10,8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1929
Physical Condition
Poor
Language
English
Hebrew
Notes
329+ pages (exact number unknown). Hardcover, cardboard bound with string. Cover is dark grey with a gilded title on the spine. Page edges are pink. Interior pages are beige with text, when the book is laying flat, the left side is in English and the right side is in Hebrew, the page numbers are the same on the corresponding English and Hebrew sides.
Accession No.
2002.69.01
Name Access
Klein, Margit
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Black Record: Germans Past and Present

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn49662
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Booklet : Paper : printed, bound : Beige ; Ht: 18,5 cm x W: 12,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Booklet : Paper : printed, bound : Beige ; Ht: 18,5 cm x W: 12,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
February 1941
Creator
Vansittart, Robert, Sir
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
English
Notes
56 pages. Softcover, paper bound with staples. Front cover is orange with a thick black border. Inside the border, the title is printed in black at the top, and the author is printed in white at the bottom. A Swastika is printed in a white circle, with the Reichsadler of the German Empire in the centre. The back cover is white with orange text. Interior pages are white with black text, divided into chapters. Narrative: The Reichsadler (English: Empire's Eagle, Imperial Eagle, or Eagle of the Empire) was a historic eagle national insignia deriving from the heraldic Roman Aquila during various times of Germany's history, including the German Empire, the Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany. After the defeat of the German Reich in 1945, the national insignia of West Germany and modern Germany is called Bundesadler.
Accession No.
2011X.215.06
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Buchenwald Camp: The Report of a Parliamentary Delegation

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn49652
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Booklet : Bound : White ; Ht: 24,3 cm x W: 15 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Booklet : Bound : White ; Ht: 24,3 cm x W: 15 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
April 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
7 pages booklet, with black text on the interior and exterior of the booklet, and is bound with two metal staples along the left edge. On the cover of the booklet is the British coat of arms with the inscription "dieu et mon droit". In the upper right corner of the cover are the letters EPP in grey pencil. The booklet is a report given by a Parlimentary Delegation, on what they witnessed at Buchenwald Camp after its liberation in 1945. It also retells prisoner accounts of events that occured within the camp.
Accession No.
2012.52.01
Name Access
Webber, Harold D.
Places
London , England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Business Card

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59495
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Business Card : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 7 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Business Card : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 11 cm x W: 7 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
December 07, 1939
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Card with embossed border, handwritten note around edge, Removed Darnley Road 1 E-9 Hackney Mare Street. Business card from N. Lessof. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.1153
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate of identity

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76297
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate of identity : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 32,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate of identity : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 32,5 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
January 13, 1947-March 07, 1947
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Folder, double-sided. 1 large page folded vertically in centre. First page is numbered page 3, indicates that document is part of a certificate of identity. This part contains visas and endorsements. Inner pages are blank. On back page, numbered page 2, are a series of stamps and handwritten endorsements relating to an immigration in February-March 1947 from the United Kingdom to Canada. Narrative: Document was donated by Eudice Bauer, the wife of Gustave Bauer. This document was part of the certificate of identity used by Gustave's mother, Anna Rosemann Bauer, when she immigrated from the United Kingdom to Canada in 1947 to join her son. Gustave was born in 1924 in Hamburg, Germany, and was on vacation in Denmark with his mother Anna and brother Werner when the Nuremberg Laws of 1935 were passed. They decided not to return to Germany, and went to stay with Anne's sister in Brussels, Belgium. Gustave's father Manfred was arrested for smuggling money out of Germany and spent the next two years in prison. Manfred joined his family in Brussels when he was released from prison in 1937. In 1940, immediately before Germany occupied Belgium, all German males born before 1924 were ordered to register. Manfred and Werner were sent to France, where they were interned. On their way to France to join them, Gustave and his mother were arrested and sent to England on the last boat to leave Belgium before it was occupied. In England, Gustave spent time in Folkestone, Pentonville Prison, Kempton Park, and Douglas, Isle of Man. He was in England from May 19 to July 4, 1940. IOn July 4, 1940 he was sent to Canada on the S.S. Sobiesky with other German nationals as prisoners of war.He was in Camp T, in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, from July 15 to August 12, 1940. He was thenmoved to Camp B, in New Brunswick, and then in 1941 was sent with other Jewish internees to Camp I, Île aux Noix, Quebec. He was sponsored for release in 1942, and his mother joined him in Canada in 1947. His father was deported from Drancy to Majdanek in 1943. It is unknown what happened to Gustave's brother Werner once he was sent to France. Neither man survived the war.
Accession No.
2011X.49.24
Name Access
Bauer, Eudice
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Enoch and Fela Eckstein with their son

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn45643
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 9,4 cm x W: 14,3 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 9,4 cm x W: 14,3 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1930
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
b&w photograph with a white border. A portrait of a man, a boy and a woman wearing dress clothes. The man is wearing a top hat with a dark coloured coat and a white shirt with a tie. The boy is wearing a beret with a dark coloured coat and a light coloured shirt with a tie. The woman is wearing a cloche hat with a dark coloured coat, adorned with fur trim, and dark leather gloves. She is wearing round glasses. From left to right, Enoch Eckstein, Fela Eckstein an their son are shown. Narrative: Enoch Eckstein was a Major in the Armed Forces and the founder of Mizrachi. Fela was his wife.
Accession No.
2000.84.16
Name Access
Shenkier, Maurice
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Envelope : Paper : beige, black ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 8 1/2 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Envelope : Paper : beige, black ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 8 1/2 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
[Prior to 1950]
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Circular black ink stamp on top right in front Narrative: Donor Emil Kroo is a Holocaust survivor originally from Munkacz (Czech Republic). Emil was in terned in a slave labour cmap in Hungary until 1944. He later met his wife Rosa Magien in Romania. After the war they were in a displaced persons camp in Fürth, Germany. Emil Kroo was the Vice-President of the Central Committee of liberated Jews in the American Zone of Germany. They immigrated to New York in 1950 before settling in Montreal.
Accession No.
2001.17.12
Name Access
Kroo, Emil
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Handbill : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Yellow, burgundy, grey ; Ht: 17 cm x W: 20 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Handbill : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Yellow, burgundy, grey ; Ht: 17 cm x W: 20 cm
Other Title Information
Advertising Medium
Date
April 19, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Single page flyer, double-sided, creased in center to form card, entitled SEARCH FOR VARIETY STARS. Flier advertises an event at the Paramount Dance Hall, London. Back page contains an entrance form. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.48
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Handbill : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Blue, Navy ; Ht: 12 cm x W: 15 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Handbill : Cardstock : Printed : Ink : Blue, Navy ; Ht: 12 cm x W: 15 cm
Other Title Information
Advertising Medium
Date
April 18, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Folded card with two holes punched on top edge, entitled Dance Band Championship, decorative line borders with stars and each end. Flyer advertising competition at The Royal. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.50
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Handbill : Paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, burgundy, green ; Ht: 12 cm x W: 18 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
object
Physical Description
Handbill : Paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, burgundy, green ; Ht: 12 cm x W: 18 cm
Other Title Information
Advertising Medium
Date
March 21, 1940
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
Notes
Single-sided handbill, gridded with list of upcoming events. Flyer for the Paramount Dance Hall Easter week. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
Accession No.
1999.1.51
Name Access
Issley, Jason
Places
London, England, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

49 records – page 1 of 5.

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