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95 records – page 1 of 10.

111 Dessins de Boris Taslitzky faits à Buchenwald 1944-1945

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn47573
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Book : printed, graphic arts : beige, black, blue ; Ht: 25,1 cm x W: 21,7 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Book : printed, graphic arts : beige, black, blue ; Ht: 25,1 cm x W: 21,7 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1944-1945
Creator
0
Physical Condition
Good
Language
English
French
Notes
500+ pages (exact page number is unknown). Cardboard cover, not bound. Cover is beige with black and blue text; a b&w drawing of a person lying down, with their hands covering their face. Interior pages are beige, the first 12 consist only of text. The remaining pages have b&w drawings of different camp scenes, with captions under each. The last 5 drawings are in colour. The book ends with a table of contents of all the included drawings.
Accession No.
2011X.110.01
Name Access
Dionne, Danielle
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Alexandra Golub and Reuben Philipson

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn49672
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 5 cm x W: 7 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : Beige ; Ht: 5 cm x W: 7 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Physical Condition
Good
Notes
b&w, couple standing next to each other, looking in the same direction. They are the donor's paternal uncle and his wife. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.314
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Birth certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn78444
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Birth certificate : Paper : Ink : beige, black ; Ht: 29,4 cm x W: 20,8 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Birth certificate : Paper : Ink : beige, black ; Ht: 29,4 cm x W: 20,8 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
November 30, 1950
Physical Condition
Excellent
Language
French
Notes
One page. One-sided photocopy of an official document. On the t. is the name Kaszemacher, Jacques. The document give the details of his birth. Narrative: Jacques Kasma was born Jacques Kaszemacher on 1935-09-04 in the 10th arrondissement of Paris (France). His father was Uszer Hersz Kaszemacher, also known as Henric Kasmacher, born on 1913-04-05 in Parczew (Poland). His mother was Chaja Sura Bajwelcwajg, born 1915-05-19 in Warsaw (Poland). Jacques had a younger sister, Jeannine, born in 1937. In 1940, Henri Kasmacher was a driver in the French army. He was captured by the German armed forces in Saint-Die-des-Vosges (France) and was deported to the forced labour camp of Brunswiek, a subcamp of Neuengamme concentration camp ( Germany). In 1943, Chaja Bajwelcwajg was arrested and interned at the Drancy transit camp (France). She died in Drancy on 1943-09-02. Jacques was hidden in Normandy (France) during the war. After Liberation, he spent time in an orphanage ran by the OSE in Le Vésinet. He met Marcel Marceau, a famous French mime, who taught him his art. Henri Kasmacher survived the war and came back to France and remarried to Ida Wolnowicz. In 1956, Jacques Kasma settled in Montreal (Canada) where he pursued an artistic career. He acted as a mime named Tit-Bo on the children's television program "La Boîte à Surprise". He worked at the National Film Board as an editor and director. He also worked with the filmmaker Gilles Groulx. He went back to France to fulfill his military service obligations and moved back to Montreal in 1960. He was part of the Douglas hospital psychiatric research team for 20 years.
Accession No.
2014.24.15
Name Access
Kasma, Puck
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, White, Blue, Red ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 3,25 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Card : Paper : Ink : Black, White, Blue, Red ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 3,25 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1954-04-11-1968
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
German
Notes
2 pages, front cover has an illustration of a brick chimney with a basin on the top, with a fire coming out of it, and a cloud above it. Back cover has blue and white stripes and a red triangle with the letter F in the centre (identification of French political prisoners). Membership card for the French Association of survivors of Buchenwald Dora and camps. Narrative: Donor Desire Klein was a survivor of Buchenwald concentration camp.
Accession No.
1998.46.01
Name Access
Klein, Desiré
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn76235
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Blue, Pink, Red ; Ht: 9 3/8 in. x W: 6 7/8 in.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Blue, Pink, Red ; Ht: 9 3/8 in. x W: 6 7/8 in.
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
January 14, 1946
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once vertically and once horizontally. Printed form from French Justice Ministry, Crimes and Pardons Division (trad.). Document attests that Tuvya Berkowicz has no criminal record. Narrative: Tuwja (Tuwyas, Tuwia, Tuvia, Tobias) Bercowicz (Berkowicz) was the father of the donor, Jack (Jacques) Berkowicz. Born in Vilna, Tuwyas immigrated to Belgium in 1933 and when Belgium fell to Nazi Germany in 1940, he fled to France, hoping to reach Morocco by boat from Marseilles. The donor's mother, Chana (Chane, Annie) (Trompeter) Berkowicz, born in Mielec, Poland, was living in Vienna, Austria with her parents and two sisters. In 1938, after the German annexation of Austria, the family fled, driving to France via Belgium. Tuwyas and Chana met in Lyon, France in 1941 and married. Their daughter Dorothée was born in 1942. The family attempted to flee France by boat in Marseilles, but were stopped by Vichy police. They fled Marseilles and went south, into the Pyrenees region, living in various small vilages. Their son Jack was born in Bernac-Dessus in 1944. The family survived the war and returned to Brussels from 1945-1948, and then immigrated to Canada with the help of the American Joint Distribution Committee. They were sponsored by Tuwyas' sister Luba, who was already living in Halifax. The Berkowicz family settled in Montreal.
Accession No.
2005.01.16
Name Access
Berkowicz, Jack
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn78323
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typed : Ink : beige, black, red ; Ht: 20,32 cm x W: 21 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate : Paper : Typed : Ink : beige, black, red ; Ht: 20,32 cm x W: 21 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
September 15, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Circular stamp at lower right with Cross of Lorraine in centre. Document is a certificate from a lieutenant in the National Liberation Movement, attesting that Maurice Wolfowiez served under him from May 1942 until the Paris uprising of August 1944. He participated in acts of sabotage under German occupation. Narrative: Maurice Wolfowiez (Wolfowicz, Deloup) was born in J?drzejów, Poland in 1906. He was working as a designer for a tailor in France when war broke out, and joined the French Resistance. He survived with his wife and two children, but his parents and six of his seven siblings were all deported to Treblinka killing centre (Poland) and murdered. He immigrated to Canada in April 1976.
Accession No.
1998.13.02
Name Access
Deloup, Maurice
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Certificate, death

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn49866
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate, death : Paper : Beige, black ; Ht: 24 cm x W: 16 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Certificate, death : Paper : Beige, black ; Ht: 24 cm x W: 16 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
January 23, 1951
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Notes
One page. Narrative: In the 1920’s Serge and Sophie Philipson (nee Orbach) left Berlin for Paris due to rising antisemitism. On July 15, 1930 their daughter Rachel was born. Serge, Sophie and Rachel were Polish citizen, they never got either the German or the French citizenship. In Paris, Serge worked for Les Modes Modernes, the hat factory of his brother-in-law, Henri. When an opportunity to expand the business in Ireland arose, Serge moved to Galway. The new factory opened in July 1938. In August 1939, Sophie, Rachel, and 4 other family members (Rachel’s cousin Stéphane, his maternal grandmother Néné, Serge’s sister Esther and Serge’s sister-in-law Choura) left for Cabourg, in Normandy. After the winter 1939-1940 it became difficult to communicate with Ireland but Rachel and Sophie could still send and receive letter from Serge. At the end of winter 1940, the group moved to Néris and in July 1940, after the occupation of France by Germany, they settled in the zone libre in the village of Cauterets, on the border with Spain. They were reunited with Robert, Serge’s brother. In August 1942, 4 family members (Sophie’s sister Ella and her husband Ernest, their daughter Ruth, Serge’s siblings Robert and Esther) were arrested by local police and deported. They were not seen again. At the beginning of 1943, Sophie, her mother Augusta and Rachel moved to Maubourguet. In April 1943, they moved to Cannes in Hotel Victoria with Henri, Stéphane and Néné. Henri, Sophie and Augusta went into hiding together while cousins Stéphane and Rachel were taken care of by Néné and returned to Maubourguet. In January 1944, Henri, Sophie and Augusta were denounced and arrested. They were transferred to Marseille before being sent by train to Drancy transit camp from where they were deported. It is believed they were killed in a Polish killing centre. In 1944, Rachel moved from one place to another – under a non-Jewish identity - and continued to correspond with her father. In June 1945, she reunited with her father Ireland. They had not seen each other for 6 years. In 1951, Rachel got married. In 1954, she immigrated to Montreal.
Accession No.
2002.08.217
Name Access
Levy, Rachel
Places
Paris ?, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Chaja Kaszemacher

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn78386
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 9,6 cm x W: 7,1 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
Photograph : Paper : printed : Ink : B&W ; Ht: 9,6 cm x W: 7,1 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
1932
Physical Condition
Excellent
Notes
B&W photograph. Outdoors. A young woman is laying in the grass with a tennis racquet. She is wearing a white outfit with a black belt. The photograph shows her head and torso. A hand is placed on her shoulder. Narrative: Chaja Kaszemacher, nee Bajwelcwajg, was born in Warsaw, Poland. She lived in Paris where she gave birth to Jacques and Janine Kaszemacher. She died on 1943-10-26 in the Drancy transit camp near Paris, France.
Accession No.
2014.24.01
Name Access
Kasma, Puck
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Citizenship Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn59791
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Citizenship Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black, blue ; Ht: 27 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
MONTREAL HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE (MHMC-01)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
Citizenship Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black, blue ; Ht: 27 cm x W: 20,5 cm
Other Title Information
Documentary Artifact
Date
June 29, 1945
Physical Condition
Good
Language
French
Dutch
Notes
Page creased horizontally and vertically, three stamps on front, tears repaired variety of tape types, fingerprint B.L. Temporary Certificate of Citizenship from Dutch Embassy for David Kropveld, issued on 29 June 1945 and expiring 29 October 1945. Narrative: David Kropveld was born on 1918/1/3 in Amsterdam, Holland. He was the third child of Samuel Kropveld (1884/3/?) and Goedge Van Cleef (1894). His father had studied to be a doctor before he was enlisted in 1916. His mother was a nursery school teacher until her marriage. As a boy he participated in Boy Scouts, acrobatic and boxing training. He studied at a commercial college, and opened a silver, gold, and diamond business during the Great Depression. In 1936 he was chosen to represent Holland as a boxer in the Olympics, but he chose not to go. He trained as a naval officer, and was prepared to attend university when the Germans occupied Holland in May 1940. In July, David and his father joined the White Brigade resistance group in the south of France. As members, David and his father gave up their Jewish identities and were responsible for taking children to safe houses and participating in armed attacks on German convoys. During this time David used the alibis Charles Seegers and Dan Daladien. In October 1942, David was arrested while smuggling war-related information between occupied and Vichy France. He was tortured for ten days before escaping with the aid of two men from the resistance. He was reunited with his father in Brussels, but the two were arrested by Gestapo officers one week later. They were incarcerated for three months and deported to Auschwitz where they were considered political prisoners and were selected for the slave labor camp at Monowitz Camp. They remained there for 5 days prior to being transferred to Treblinka Camp. In Treblinka, David witnessed his father’s murder at the hands of a guard. During this time Goedge had been sent to Sobibor where she was gassed and cremated on 1943/5/7. In the fall of 1944, a guard recognized David as a boxer he admired and had him transferred back to Auschwitz and on to Monowitz in December 1944 to compete in boxing matches against other prisoners. The rest of David’s family was killed during the war. Of his siblings Gretha (1914) died of hunger in Malapane, Poland with her husband in September 1942, Hartog (1916) was injured as a sergeant in the army and executed after his capture on 1943/6/30, Rosette (June 1922) was gassed in Sobibor on 1943/7/23 while pregnant, and Israel (March 1924) was beaten to death during a protest on a transport bound for Buchenwald. In December 1944, David managed to escape the death march with a few other prisoners. He was rescued shortly after and brought to a hospital until his health improved, although he never fully recovered and spent most of his life physically handicapped. In the summer of 1945, David met his wife, Annie Cohen. They had two sons, Mike and Phillip Kropveld. In 1947, the couple immigrated to Cuba, and then, in 1950, to Montreal, Canada, where David began a successful career as a butcher. He died in Montreal on 2008/11/26 at the age of 91.
Accession No.
1990.83.8
Name Access
Kropveld, David
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Images
Less detail

Dawang, Elie - Oral History of a Holocaust Survivor

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn60321
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
03:55:00
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 video     1 image  
Collection
WITNESS TO HISTORY COLLECTION (MHMC-02)
Description Level
Item
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
03:55:00
Creator
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Language
French
Notes
Elie Dawang was born on January 4, 1934 in Paris, France, to Lithuanian parents. Elie has good memories of his early childhood, being raised by loving and well-off parents. In May 1940, the Dawangs left Paris for a small village near the Spanish border. Despite the great danger, they went back to Paris to liquidate the business of Feivish, Elie’s father. The three of them were arrested in September 1941 and while Feivish managed to get Elie out of prison, he couldn’t do anything to save himself or his wife. They were both sentenced and sent to jail for possessing false papers. They both ended up in Auschwitz, but Elie’s mother was gassed upon arrival whereas Feivish survived the war. Meanwhile, Elie was being taken care of by a Jewish woman. Elie and his caretaker almost got arrested during the roundup of Vel d’Hiv but managed to hide. After a few months hiding in the suburbs of Paris, they moved to the country where they stayed until liberation. When Paris was liberated, they moved back there and Elie returned to school. He reunited with his father in May 1945. They moved to Canada in 1951 with Elie’s stepmother. Elie describes the process to immigrate, his first impressions of Montreal and Canada and his involvement in Holocaust education.
Accession No.
WTH-482
Name Access
Dawang, Elie
Places
Paris, France, Europe
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Montreal Holocaust Memorial Centre
Video Tracks
Images
Less detail

95 records – page 1 of 10.

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