Canadian Jewish Heritage Network

TEMPLE EMANU-EL.

https://www.cjhn.ca/en/permalink/cjhn62
Collection
TEMPLE EMANU-EL.
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
0.31 metres of textual records.
Fonds No.
I0060
Scope and Content
Charter and by-laws (1925). Reports (1919-1920). Board members (1976). Deceased members (1957, 1985). Correspondence (1944, 1946, 1958, 1967, 1980). Bulletins (1927-1989, with gaps). Dedication/anniversary books (1932-1982, with gaps). Programs (1945-1985, with gaps). Lectures (1897-1967 with gaps)…
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
TEMPLE EMANU-EL.
Description Level
Fonds
Physical Description
0.31 metres of textual records.
Scope and Content
Charter and by-laws (1925). Reports (1919-1920). Board members (1976). Deceased members (1957, 1985). Correspondence (1944, 1946, 1958, 1967, 1980). Bulletins (1927-1989, with gaps). Dedication/anniversary books (1932-1982, with gaps). Programs (1945-1985, with gaps). Lectures (1897-1967 with gaps). Reprinted article (1963). School magazine (1935-1936, 1939, 1941). School handbook (1969). Course lists (1933, 1937, 1939). Lecture list (1920). Museum information. Report (1977). Scrapbook (1930s-1940s). Picture of proposed building (c.1957). Jewish Yearbook entries (1936, 1946, 1954, 1964). Invitations. Flyers. Bookmarks. Clippings (1882-1991, with gaps).
Date
1882-1991.
Fonds No.
I0060
History Biographical
In the 1880s, a group of Montrealers became interested in Reform Judaism, then popular in the United States. In 1882, they met to organize what would become the city's third synagogue, the Temple Emanu-El, which was incorporated in 1883. Cemetery land was also purchased. Their first services were held in the Zion Church on Beaver Hall Hill. After several moves, the congregation bought land on Sherbrooke Street, and built a synagogue in 1911. The building was expanded to include a school, and in 1957 was expanded again. Unfortunately, the sanctuary burned down several months later, but by 1959 a new one had been dedicated. Since then, the Temple Emanu-El has only enhanced the buildings it already has rather than expand further. In 1980, the synagogue merged with the Temple Beth Sholom. The Temple Emanu-El Beth Sholom is one of the largest Reform synagogues in Canada and has occupied its present location for over eighty years. It is honoured as the representative synagogue on a mural of familiar Montreal institutions in some of the cars of the Montreal subway (Metro) system.
Notes
Half originals and half copies.
Archival / Genealogical
Archival Descriptions
Repository
Canadian Jewish Archives
Images
Less detail