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10 notices – page 1 de 1.

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59304
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Ink : white ; Ht: 6 1/4 in. x W: 6 1/2 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Ink : white ; Ht: 6 1/4 in. x W: 6 1/2 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
August 7, 1928
État
Good
Language
Russian
Notes
Square notebook sheet with light green-ink text and light violet doctor's stamp on bottom left side. This document is an information about the health condition of Mrs. Haya Shlimovich. It was issued by doctor F.S. Gorenshtein of the city Proskurov (now is Khmelnytskyi).
No d'acquisition
2001.16.1
Vedettes de noms
Soicher, Sylvia
Access géographique
Proskurov, Ukraine, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59365
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, blue, purple, red. ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 20 cm
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, blue, purple, red. ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 20 cm
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
December 17, 1956
État
Good
Language
German
Notes
Paper folded horizontally and vertically, perforated left edge, Magistrate header with bold underlining, dated 17 December 1956. Certificate of Illness No. 23333 for Isadore Lorincz, Hungarian refugee, states that he was ill. Narrative: Rev. Isodore Lorincz was born 6 January 1908 in Hungary. His parents were Lowi Netti and Loliner (?) Jakob. He attended high school and Yeshiva, and graduated from the Jewish Theological Seminary of Budapest with ordination and smicha. During World War 2 his family was killed in Auschwitz. He came to Canada in 1957 after fleeing the revolution in Hungary. He served in two congregations before serving the Shaare Zedek Congregation as ritual director, then as Chazzan Sheni with a congregation in Hamilton, Ontario, for three years. Afterwards he served as rabbi in Port Colborne, Ontario. He settled in Montreal, Quebec, in 1962 where he became Chazzan Sheni for the next 26 years. He and his wife, Zita, continued to live in Montreal until there death around 2005.
No d'acquisition
2000.65.81
Vedettes de noms
Goldman, Harry
Access géographique
Vienna, Germany, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
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Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
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Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59372
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Cardstock, paper : Printed : ink : Yellow, black, beige ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 10 cm
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Cardstock, paper : Printed : ink : Yellow, black, beige ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 10 cm
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
December 21, 1956
État
Excellent
Language
English
French
Notes
Softcover booklet with black, bold border down spine, World Health Organization symbol on top of cover, each page has chart for vaccination of different diseases, i.e. Smallpox, Yellow Fever, Cholera, etc. Contains insert from Department of Public Health and Welfare City of Halifax -discusses X-ray for Tuberculosis Jan. 6, 1957. Booklet certifies that Isidore Lorincz has been vaccinated against small pox with signature and seal. Narrative: Rev. Isodore Lorincz was born 6 January 1908 in Hungary. His parents were Lowi Netti and Loliner (?) Jakob. He attended high school and Yeshiva, and graduated from the Jewish Theological Seminary of Budapest with ordination and smicha. During World War 2 his family was killed in Auschwitz. He came to Canada in 1957 after fleeing the revolution in Hungary. He served in two congregations before serving the Shaare Zedek Congregation as ritual director, then as Chazzan Sheni with a congregation in Hamilton, Ontario, for three years. Afterwards he served as rabbi in Port Colborne, Ontario. He settled in Montreal, Quebec, in 1962 where he became Chazzan Sheni for the next 26 years. He and his wife, Zita, continued to live in Montreal until there death around 2005. Zita was born 2 Jan 1917 in Nograd, Hungary.
No d'acquisition
2000.77.1
Vedettes de noms
Goldman, Harry
Access géographique
Austria, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59373
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Cardstock, paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, black ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 10 cm
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Cardstock, paper : Printed : Ink : Yellow, black ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 10 cm
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
December 21, 1956
État
Excellent
Language
English
French
Notes
Softcover booklet with black, bold border down spine, World Health Organization symbol on top of cover, each page has chart for vaccination of different diseases, i.e. smallpox, yellow fever, cholera etc. Contains insert from Department of Public Health and Welfare City of Halifax -discusses X-ray for Tuberculosis Jan. 6, 1957. Booklet certifies that Zita Lorincz has been vaccinated against smallpox. Narrative: Rev. Isodore Lorincz was born 6 January 1908 in Hungary. His parents were Lowi Netti and Loliner (?) Jakob. He attended high school and Yeshiva, and graduated from the Jewish Theological Seminary of Budapest with ordination and smicha. During World War 2 his family was killed in Auschwitz. He came to Canada in 1957 after fleeing the revolution in Hungary. He served in two congregations before serving the Shaare Zedek Congregation as ritual director, then as Chazzan Sheni with a congregation in Hamilton, Ontario, for three years. Afterwards he served as rabbi in Port Colborne, Ontario. He settled in Montreal, Quebec, in 1962 where he became Chazzan Sheni for the next 26 years. He and his wife, Zita, continued to live in Montreal until there death around 2005. Zita was born 2 Jan 1917 in Nograd, Hungary.
No d'acquisition
2000.77.2
Vedettes de noms
Goldman, Harry
Access géographique
Austria, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59448
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 20 cm x W: 22 cm
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Typewritten : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 20 cm x W: 22 cm
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
September 26, 1940
État
Good
Language
English
Notes
Page with two holes punched on left edge, single-sided stock for with additions added by hand. This is an Inoculation Certificate from the Camp L Internment operations in Canada. Mr. Isselbaecher was interned in England and sent to Canada as a potential enemy alien. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remaining prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
No d'acquisition
1999.1.68
Vedettes de noms
Issley, Jason
Access géographique
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59472
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 22 cm
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 14 cm x W: 22 cm
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
1939-February 09, 1945
État
Good
Language
English
French
Notes
Page with line of holes punched on sides, Department of Labour letterhead, printed sheet with typewritten details added, Instructions on back. Certificate of Department of Labour summoning Herbert Isselbacher to a medical exam. He was officially released from internment and was required to have a medical check before being drafted into the Armed Forces labour division. Narrative: Isaac Herbert Isselbacher was born 1919-11-20 in Isselbach, Germany. His brother was Helmut Isselbacher, born 1921-12-20. Their father was Jacob Isselbacher, born 1883-08-05. They had an uncle and aunt, David and Betty Loewenstein, who lived in New York City with their two children. Isaac left Germany on 1939-07-29, hoping to join his relatives in NYC. He only had the time to get to London, England before the war broke out and started working in a factory. He was arrested at his workplace as an ‘enemy alien’ and sent to Canada for internment in 1940. Isaac was interned in Camp N in Sherbrooke, Quebec. He was drafted into the Works Program Division for woodworking and net-making. In 1940, he received a last letter from his parents which suggested their imminent deportation. After his release, circa November 1942, Isaac worked as a locksmith. He married Fanny Azeff on 1943-12-26 at the Bnai Jacob synagogue in Montreal. Fanny was born on 1921-12-23 in Canada, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Azeff. Isaac was naturalized as a Canadian citizen on 1946-06-08. Fanny was naturalized on 1946-08-30 (she had lost her citizenship by marrying Isaac). Isaac’s brother, Helmut Isselbacher, was deported with Transport XXII A from Dossin casern in Mechelen (Malines), Belgium to Auschwitz Birkenau, Poland on 1943-09-20. Of the 2,450 people on the transport, 100 men were selected to work –including Helmut- and the remainder prisoners were gassed. Helmut was made to work as a welder, and was soon fitting new pipes for the gas chamber. He suffered a nervous breakdown as a result. As he was a valued welder, he was transferred to a labour camp in Upper Silesia (Poland) where he remained for two years. As the Russian army advanced, the 6,000 prisoners of this camp were evacuated by train. Helmut remembered being forced to march as the other prisoners died from exhaustion. When liberation was announced, the survivors travelled by ship from Luebeck, Germany, to Sweden with the aid of the Red Cross. After recovery, Helmut decided to remain in Sweden as a welder. Upon learning of his brother’s survival, Helmut travelled to New York in April 1946 to meet with him and their Loewenstein relatives. Afterwards, Helmut travelled to Canada bringing with him a washing machine and bras as late wedding presents for his brother and Fanny. By 1946-08-12, their parents were presumed dead and the two sons inquired into their estate. They received a deed for the land and travelled to the estate to discover that the current owner of their house was their old maid and her son had become the town mayor. Various disputes arose with the current ‘owners’ who believed the Isselbacher family dead. Isaac wished to discuss a settlement, but the mayor’s mother –not realizing Fanny understood German- called the neighbours at work to warn them not to come home as the Isselbacher sons had resurfaced. Payment for the land had reportedly been sent to Israel, though no documentation could be provided.
No d'acquisition
1999.1.99
Vedettes de noms
Issley, Jason
Access géographique
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59560
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical Certificate : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : Beige, blue, black, red. ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 20 cm
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical Certificate : Paper : Printed, handwritten : Ink : Beige, blue, black, red. ; Ht: 15 cm x W: 20 cm
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
July 15, 1948
État
Good
Language
German
Notes
Page creased down center, double-sided, gridded into sections by personal information and various diseases. Vaccination certificate stating that two vaccinations for Typhus Abdominalis were administered to Jeno in the Hallein DP camp in July 1948. Narrative: Jeno Markowicz (Marcovits) was born in D?m?cu?eni (Domokos), Romania. His father was Harcovei Solomon Markowicz, born in 1884. His mother was Faui Fried born in 1888. Jeno was placed in internment at the Mauthausen Concentration Camp in 1943. He worked as a baker there until its liberation on 1945/5/6. From 1946/11/1 he was in Salzburg, until he was discharged on 1948/1/15. He was relocated to the Displaced Persons Camp of Hallein on 1947/2/2. While there he worked for the American Joint Distribution Company as a car washer starting 1947/9/19. He remained there until 1948/7/18. He immigrated to Quebec, Canada, on 1947/10/10 in the Third Class compartment of the R.M.S Scythia
No d'acquisition
1997.1.4
Vedettes de noms
Greenberg, Gerald
Access géographique
Hallein, Austria, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical Certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn59566
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 10 cm x W: 14 cm
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical Certificate : Paper : Printed : Ink : Beige, black ; Ht: 10 cm x W: 14 cm
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
January 26, 1948
État
Good
Language
German
Notes
Page folded in half vertically with branched creases on bottom edge, serrated edge on left, entitled Entlassungsfchein. Certificate of discharge for Jeno Markovits at the end of his hospital visit, lasting from 1948/1/15 till 1948/1/26. Narrative: Jeno Markowicz (Marcovits) was born in D?m?cu?eni (Domokos), Romania. His father was Harcovei Solomon Markowicz, born in 1884. His mother was Faui Fried born in 1888. Jeno was placed in internment at the Mauthausen Concentration Camp in 1943. He worked as a baker there until its liberation on 1945/5/6. From 1946/11/1 he was in Salzburg, until he was discharged on 1948/1/15. He was relocated to the Displaced Persons Camp of Hallein on 1947/2/2. While there he worked for the American Joint Distribution Company as a car washer starting 1947/9/19. He remained there until 1948/7/18. He immigrated to Quebec, Canada, on 1947/10/10 in the Third Class compartment of the R.M.S Scythia
No d'acquisition
1997.1.12
Vedettes de noms
Greenberg, Gerald
Access géographique
Salzburg, Austria, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76186
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
État
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Albert Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on 1944-03-20, and a test on 1944-05-02 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Albert Baron, born 1934, was the younger brother of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.02
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76187
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
État
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Maurice Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on 1944-03-20, and a test on 1944-05-02 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.03
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

10 notices – page 1 of 1.

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