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150669 notices – page 1 de 15067.

Life Goes On

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76183
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
graphic material
Collation
Print : paper : woodcut : ink : b&w ; Ht: 13 in. x W: 9 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
graphic material
Collation
Print : paper : woodcut : ink : b&w ; Ht: 13 in. x W: 9 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Original Art, Work on Paper
Dates ultimes
[ca. 1954-1956]
Créateur
Mrozewski, Stefan
État
Excellent
Notes
Black ink on white paper. Abstract scene with a young man and woman in tattered clothing holding hands and walking on a path, lit up from above by sunrays and a big Torah scroll hanging over them. Narrative: All 16 of the prints in this series depict life of Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto during the Holocaust. Printmaker, book illustrator and painter, Stefan Mrozewski was born in Czéstochowa, Poland. Mrozewski's prints are in permament collections of several public art collections in Europe and North America. The artist was married to Irena Blizinska. An ardent patriot, he was a volunteer in the Polish Army in the war against the Soviet Union in 1920, as well as during the Second World War when he served in Armia Krajowa, the clandestine Polish Home Army.
No d'acquisition
2000.69.16
Vedettes de noms
Hornstein, Michael
Access géographique
Warsaw, Poland, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Blanket

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76184
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
object
Collation
Blanket : woven, sewn : grey, black
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
object
Collation
Blanket : woven, sewn : grey, black
Autre information pour le titre
Bedding
Dates ultimes
1939-1944
État
Good
Notes
Woven wool blanket with 3 raw fringed edges and 1 finished edge. The wool is different shades of grey (with some black) , giving the blanket a speckled look. Narrative: One of two blankets distributed to the donor, Marcel Tenenbaum, and his parents, by German guards. Blankets were given to inmates of Malines (Mechelen), a Belgian transit camp for Jews awaiting deportation to camps further east. The Tenenbaums had lived in Brussels since 1935, the year Marcel was born. They went into hiding in 1942, in the attic of a building belonging to the former employer of Marcel's father. In 1944, they were denounced and arrested. They were taken to Malines, but arrived after the last transport to Poland had left. The guards fled, asking the imprisoned Jews to tell the Allies that they had been well treated. The camp was liberated by British forces in September 1944, and the family returned to Brussels. They immigrated to Canada in 1951.
No d'acquisition
2001.05.02
Vedettes de noms
Tenenbaum, Marcel
Access géographique
Malines, Belgium, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Memorial for Czenstochover Landsmannschaft

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76185
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
object
Collation
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 2 3/4 in. x W: 3 7/8 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
object
Collation
Photograph : Paper ; Ht: 2 3/4 in. x W: 3 7/8 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Advertising Medium
Dates ultimes
1966
État
Good
Language
Yiddish
Notes
b&w, group of men and women seated behind table on a stage, banner behind them. In front of them are plants, as well as a memorial of a Star of David on a black platform with lit candles. Banner says 'Liquidation of the Czestochowa ghetto from Yom Kippur to Simchas Torah, 1942' (trad. from Yiddish.)
No d'acquisition
2001.48.25
Vedettes de noms
Orenstein, Benjamin
Access géographique
Montreal, Canada, North America
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76186
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
État
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Albert Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on 1944-03-20, and a test on 1944-05-02 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Albert Baron, born 1934, was the younger brother of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.02
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76187
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
État
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Maurice Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on 1944-03-20, and a test on 1944-05-02 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.03
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Medical certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76188
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Medical certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Grey ; Ht: 4 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
March 20, 1944-May 02, 1944
État
Good
Language
English
Notes
1 horizontal page, single-sided. Folded once vertically. Document is a vaccination certificate for Jakob Baron, issued by the Health Service of the Colonial Navigation Company. Document attests that he was vaccinated against smallpox on March 3, 1944, and a test on May 2, 1944 found him to be immune. Document is signed by the surgeon of the ship Serpa Pinto. Narrative: Jakob Baron was the father of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year.The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944. The Serpa Pinto was a Portuguese transport ship, which sailed under the command of Captain Americo Dos Santos. With a capacity of 600 people, the ship made regular trips from Lisbon, Portugal to Rio de Janeiro, New York City, Philadelphia and Baltimore. It has been estimated that the ship transported about 7800 refugees, among them hundreds of Jews during the Second World War.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.04
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Lisbon, Portugal, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Travel permit

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76189
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Travel permit : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Pink, Black ; Ht: 12 in. x W: 8 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Travel permit : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Pink, Black ; Ht: 12 in. x W: 8 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
December 16, 1942-January 06, 1943
État
Poor
Language
French
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded three times horizontally and once vertically. Document is a temporary travel permit for Jacob (Jakob) Baron, issued in place of a travel pass (sauf conduit) in Luchon (Bagnères-de-Luchon) on December 16. 1942. Document permits him to travel by rail, via the Haute-Garonne - Toulouse - Limoges route, to see his family. The pass is valid for 3 weeks, until January 6, 1943. It was issued in Luchon (Bagnères-de-Luchon), and is signed by the Chief Adjutant Brigade Commander. Document was torn and taped back together, 2 cm of the form is missing under bottom horizontal fold crease. Form is nearly identical to that of his wife, Rose (2002.13.09). Narrative: Jakob (Jacob) Baron, born 1902 in Wieruszów, Poland, was the father of the donor, Maurice Baron. The family fled south to Toulouse in 1940, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. Based on the date of this document, it is possible that this travel permit enabled the family to travel out of Bagnères-de-Luchon and get to Spain. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.10
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Bagnères-de-Luchon, France, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Permit : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Red, Grey ; Ht: 7 3/8 in. x W: 5 1/2 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  2 images  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Permit : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black, Red, Grey ; Ht: 7 3/8 in. x W: 5 1/2 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
February 12, 1941-May 07, 1943
État
Good
Language
French
Notes
1 page, double-sided. Folded once horizontally and once vertically. Document is a receipt for the request of or renewal of an identity card for Rose Baron née Klarman, but in fact served as residence permit for her forced residence status. Square b&w photograph of subject is affixed at top left corner of form, which is numbered 7275 by hand in red ink. Above the photo, a handwritten annotation in red ink says that a decision was read on February 12, 1941, and under the photo, in the same handwriting, it is noted that Rose has been issued a forced residence (résidence assignée). Receipt was issued in Toulouse for residence in Bagnères-de-Luchon on February 21, 1942, and is valid, only within the same municipality, until September 7, 1942. On verso, stamps indicate that the permit was renewed twice: from May 7, 1942 to November 7, 1942, and November 7, 1942 to May 7, 1943. On verso, top, illegible handwriting in red ink relating to the chief of police and the date November 9, 1942. Annotations and addendums in red ink serve to transform this form from a document for requesting/renewing identity cards to a residence permit for controlling and surveilling stateless Jews in the Free Zone of Vichy France. Narrative: Rayala (Rayzele, Rose, Rosa) Baron, née Klarman, born 1903 in Warsaw, Poland, was the mother of the donor, Maurice Baron. Maurice Baron was born in Nancy, France in 1931. He fled south to Toulouse in 1940 with his family, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.11
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Toulouse, France, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Police certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76191
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Police certificate : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 8 1/2 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Police certificate : Paper : Printed, Typed : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 8 1/2 in. x W: 6 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
June 9, 1943-June 20, 1943
État
Good
Language
Spanish
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once vertically and 4 times horizontally. Missing vertical section on right side. Document states that Rosa Baron must present herself to the police every Sunday to ensure that she has not changed address. Document is numbered 317 and is written on the letterhead of the Barcelona Police Headquarters. Beneath letterhead, the words Concepcion Extranjeros refer to the fact that the Baron family are foreigners in Spain. It is dated June 9, 1943 and stamps at bottom of page indicate that she presented herself to the police the subsequent 2 Sundays (June 13 and 20, 1943). Her husband Jacob has a nearly identical form (2002.13.07). Narrative: Rayala (Rayzele, Rose, Rosa) Baron, née Klarman, born 1903 in Warsaw, Poland, was the mother of the donor, Maurice Baron. The family fled south to Toulouse in 1940, where they were assigned forced residence status on February 2, 1941. The Vichy Statute of October 4, 1940 stated that foreign Jews could at any time be assigned a forced residence by the prefect of the department in which they resided. This forced residence was in Bagnères-de-Luchon, on the Spanish border. On December 17, 1942 the Barons left Bagnères-de-Luchon, crossed the Pyrenees on foot, entered Spain and lived in Barcelona for one year. The Barons obtained visas to enter Canada via Portugal and travelled to Philadelphia via the Serpa Pinto, which left Lisbon on March 23, 1944 and docked in Philadelphia on April 6, 1944. They arrived in Montreal by train on April 8, 1944.
No d'acquisition
2002.13.14
Vedettes de noms
Baron, Maurice
Access géographique
Barcelona, Spain, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

Marriage certificate

https://www.cjhn.ca/fr/permalink/cjhn76192
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Marriage certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 13 3/8 in. x W: 8 1/4 in.
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
  1 image  
Collection
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Niveau de description
Item
Genre de document
textual record
Collation
Marriage certificate : Paper : Printed, Handwritten : Ink : Beige, Black ; Ht: 13 3/8 in. x W: 8 1/4 in.
Autre information pour le titre
Documentary Artifact
Dates ultimes
1930
État
Good
Language
Hebrew
Notes
1 page, single-sided. Folded once horizontally and once vertically. Decorative graphic border. Document is a printed marriage certificate form, filled in by hand. On verso, two illegible words handwritten upside-down in red ink at top centre. Narrative: This was the marriage certificate of Sara (Sala) Hermann and Salomon Heiss, the parents of the donor, Erika Bloom. They married in 1930 in Vienna, Austria. The family fled to Shanghai in late 1938, when Erika was 6 months old. They lived there for 10 years before immigrating to Israel in 1949, eventually settling in Montreal in 1953.
No d'acquisition
2002.22.01
Vedettes de noms
Bloom, Erika
Access géographique
Vienna, Austria, Europe
Archives / Généalogie
Archival Descriptions
Dépôt d'archives
Montreal Holocaust Museum
Images
Moins de détails

150669 notices – page 1 of 15067.

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